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More fault tolerant approach to address resolution for a Multi-LAN system of Ethernets (RFC1029)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000001833D
Original Publication Date: 1988-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Sep-12
Document File: 14 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

G. Parr: AUTHOR

Abstract

Executing a protocol P, a sending host S decides, through P's routing mechanism, that it wants to transmit to a target host T located somewhere on a connected piece of 10Mbit Ethernet cable which conforms to IEEE 802.3. To actually transmit the Ethernet packet, a 48 bit Ethernet/hardware address must be generated. The addresses assigned to hosts within protocol P are not always compatible with the corresponding Ethernet address (being different address space byte orderings or values). A protocol is presented which allows dynamic distribution of the information required to build tables that translate a host's address in protocol P's address space into a 48 bit Ethernet address. An extension is incorporated to allow such a protocol to be flexible enough to exist in a Transparent Bridge, or generic Host. The capability of the Bridge to detect host reboot conditions in a multi-LAN environment is also discussed, emphasising particularly the effect on channel bandwidth. To illustrate the operation of the protocol mechanisms, the Internet Protocol (IP) is used as a benchmark [6], [8]. Part 1 presents an introduction to Address Resolution, whilst Part 2 discusses a reboot detection process.

This text was extracted from a ASCII document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 7% of the total text.

Network Working Group G. Parr

Request For Comments: 1029 University of Ulster

May 1988

A MORE FAULT TOLERANT APPROACH TO ADDRESS RESOLUTION FOR

A MULTI-LAN SYSTEM OF ETHERNETS

STATUS OF THIS MEMO

This memo discusses an extension to a Bridge Protocol to detect and

disclose changes in neighbouring host address parameters in a Multi-

LAN system of Ethernets. The problem is one which is appearing more

and more regularly as the interconnected systems grow larger on

Campuses and in Commercial Institutions. This RFC suggests a

protocol enhancement for the Internet community, and requests

discussion and suggestions for improvements. Distribution of this

memo is unlimited.

ABSTRACT

Executing a protocol P, a sending host S decides, through P's routing

mechanism, that it wants to transmit to a target host T located

somewhere on a connected piece of 10Mbit Ethernet cable which

conforms to IEEE 802.3. To actually transmit the Ethernet packet, a

48 bit Ethernet/hardware address must be generated. The addresses

assigned to hosts within protocol P are not always compatible with

the corresponding Ethernet address (being different address space

byte orderings or values). A protocol is presented which allows

dynamic distribution of the information required to build tables that

translate a host's address in protocol P's address space into a 48

bit Ethernet address. An extension is incorporated to allow such a

protocol to be flexible enough to exist in a Transparent Bridge, or

generic Host. The capability of the Bridge to detect host reboot

conditions in a multi-LAN environment is also discussed, emphasising

particularly the effect on channel bandwidth. To illustrate the

operation of the protocol mechanisms, the Internet Protocol (IP) is

used as a benchmark [6], [8]. Part 1 presents an introduction to

Address Resolution, whilst Part 2 discusses a reboot detection

process.

DEFINITIONS:

CATENET: a group of IP networks linked together

IP : Internet Protocol

PART 1

INTRODUCTION

In the Ethernet, while all packets are broadcast, the hardware

interface selects only those with either the explicit hardware

broadcast address or the individual hardware address of this

interface. Packets which do not have one of these two addresses are

rejected by the interface and do not get passed to the host software.

This saves a great deal of otherwise wasted effort by the host

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