Browse Prior Art Database

On testing the NETBLT Protocol over divers networks (RFC1030)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000001835D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Sep-12
Document File: 13 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

M.L. Lambert: AUTHOR

Abstract

NETBLT (NETwork BLock Transfer) is a transport level protocol intended for the rapid transfer of a large quantity of data between computers. It provides a transfer that is reliable and flow controlled, and is designed to provide maximum throughput over a wide variety of networks. The NETBLT protocol is specified in RFC-998; this document assumes an understanding of the specification as described in RFC-998.

This text was extracted from a ASCII document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 7% of the total text.

Network Working Group M. Lambert

Request for Comments: 1030 M.I.T. Laboratory for Computer Science

November 1987

On Testing the NETBLT Protocol over Divers Networks

STATUS OF THIS MEMO

This RFC describes the results gathered from testing NETBLT over

three networks of differing bandwidths and round-trip delays. While

the results are not complete, the information gathered so far has

been very promising and supports RFC-998's assertion that that NETBLT

can provide very high throughput over networks with very different

characteristics. Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

1. Introduction

NETBLT (NETwork BLock Transfer) is a transport level protocol

intended for the rapid transfer of a large quantity of data between

computers. It provides a transfer that is reliable and flow

controlled, and is designed to provide maximum throughput over a wide

variety of networks. The NETBLT protocol is specified in RFC-998;

this document assumes an understanding of the specification as

described in RFC-998.

Tests over three different networks are described in this document.

The first network, a 10 megabit-per-second Proteon Token Ring, served

as a "reference environment" to determine NETBLT's best possible

performance. The second network, a 10 megabit-per-second Ethernet,

served as an access path to the third network, the 3 megabit-per-

second Wideband satellite network. Determining NETBLT's performance

over the Ethernet allowed us to account for Ethernet-caused behaviour

in NETBLT transfers that used the Wideband network. Test results for

each network are described in separate sections. The final section

presents some conclusions and further directions of research. The

document's appendices list test results in detail.

2. Acknowledgements

Many thanks are due Bob Braden, Stephen Casner, and Annette DeSchon

of ISI for the time they spent analyzing and commenting on test

results gathered at the ISI end of the NETBLT Wideband network tests.

Bob Braden was also responsible for porting the IBM PC/AT NETBLT

implementation to a SUN-3 workstation running UNIX. Thanks are also

due Mike Brescia, Steven Storch, Claudio Topolcic and others at BBN

who provided much useful information about the Wideband network, and

helped monitor it during testing.

3. Implementations and Test Programs

This section briefly describes the NETBLT implementations and test

programs used in the testing. Currently, NETBLT runs on three

machine types: Symbolics LISP machines, IBM PC/ATs, and SU...