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Ethics and the Internet (RFC1087)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000001896D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Sep-12
Document File: 2 page(s) / 4K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

At great human and economic cost, resources drawn from the U.S. Government, industry and the academic community have been assembled into a collection of interconnected networks called the Internet. Begun as a vehicle for experimental network research in the mid- 1970's, the Internet has become an important national infrastructure supporting an increasingly widespread, multi-disciplinary community of researchers ranging, inter alia, from computer scientists and electrical engineers to mathematicians, physicists, medical researchers, chemists, astronomers and space scientists.

This text was extracted from a ASCII Text document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 70% of the total text.

Network Working Group Internet Activities Board

Request for Comments: 1087 January 1989

Ethics and the Internet

Status of this Memo

This memo is a statement of policy by the Internet Activities Board

(IAB) concerning the proper use of the resources of the Internet.

Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Introduction

At great human and economic cost, resources drawn from the U.S.

Government, industry and the academic community have been assembled

into a collection of interconnected networks called the Internet.

Begun as a vehicle for experimental network research in the mid-

1970's, the Internet has become an important national infrastructure

supporting an increasingly widespread, multi-disciplinary community

of researchers ranging, inter alia, from computer scientists and

electrical engineers to mathematicians, physicists, medical

researchers, chemists, astronomers and space scientists.

As is true of other common infrastructures (e.g., roads, water

reservoirs and delivery systems, and the power generation and

distribution network), there is widespread dependence on the Internet

by its users for the support of day-to-day research activities.

The reliable operation of the Internet and the responsible use of its

resources is of common interest and concern for its users, operators

and sponsors. Recent events involving the hosts on the Internet and

in similar network infrastructures underscore the need to reiterate

the professional responsibility every Internet user bears to

colleagues and to the sponsors of the system. Many of the Internet

resources are provided by the U.S. Government. Abuse of the system

thus becomes a Federal matter above and beyond simple professional

ethics.

IAB Statement of Policy

The Internet is a national facility whose utility is largely a

consequence of its wide availability and accessibility.

Irresponsible use of this critical resource poses an enormous threat

to its continued availability to the technical community.

The U.S. Government sponsors of this system have a fiduciary

responsibility to the public to allocate government resources wisely

and effectively. Justification for the support of this system

suffers when highly disruptive abuses occur. Access to and use of

the Internet is a privilege and should be treated as such by all

users of this system.

The IAB strongly endorses the view of the Division Advisory Panel of

the National Science Foundation Division of Network, Communications

Research and Infrastructure which, in paraphrase, characterized as

unethical and unacceptable any activity which purposely:

(a) seeks to gain unauthorized access to the resources of the

Internet,

(b) disrupts the intended use of the Internet,

(c) wastes resources (people, capacity, computer) through such

actions,

(d) destroys the integrity of ...