Browse Prior Art Database

Telnet terminal-type option (RFC1091)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000001900D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Sep-12
Document File: 6 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

J. VanBokkelen: AUTHOR

Abstract

Status of This Memo

This text was extracted from a ASCII document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 23% of the total text.

Network Working Group J. VanBokkelen

Request for Comments: 1091 FTP Software, Inc.

Obsoletes: RFC 930 February 1989

Telnet Terminal-Type Option

Status of This Memo

This RFC specifies a standard for the Internet community. Hosts on

the Internet that exchange terminal type information within the

Telnet protocol are expected to adopt and implement this standard.

This standard supersedes RFC 930. A change is made to permit cycling

through a list of possible terminal types and selecting the most

appropriate.

Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

1. Command Name and Code

TERMINAL-TYPE 24

2. Command Meanings

IAC WILL TERMINAL-TYPE

Sender is willing to send terminal type information in a

subsequent sub-negotiation.

IAC WON'T TERMINAL-TYPE

Sender refuses to send terminal type information.

IAC DO TERMINAL-TYPE

Sender is willing to receive terminal type information in a

subsequent sub-negotiation.

IAC DON'T TERMINAL-TYPE

Sender refuses to accept terminal type information.

IAC SB TERMINAL-TYPE SEND IAC SE

Server requests client to transmit his (the client's) next

terminal type, and switch emulation modes (if more than one

terminal type is supported). The code for SEND is 1. (See

below.)

IAC SB TERMINAL-TYPE IS ... IAC SE

Client is stating the name of his current (or only) terminal

type. The code for IS is 0. (See below.)

3. Default

WON'T TERMINAL-TYPE

Terminal type information will not be exchanged.

DON'T TERMINAL-TYPE

Terminal type information will not be exchanged.

4. Motivation for the Option

On most machines with bit-mapped displays (e.g., PCs and graphics

workstations) a client terminal emulation program is used to simulate

a conventional ASCII terminal. Most of these programs have multiple

emulation modes, frequently with widely varying characteristics.

Likewise, modern host system software and applications can deal with

a variety of terminal types. What is needed is a means for the

client to present a list of available terminal emulation modes to the

server, from which the server can select the one it prefers (for

arbitrary reasons). There is also need for a mechanism to change

emulation modes during the course of a session, perhaps according to

the needs of applications programs.

Existing terminal-type passing mechanisms within Telnet were not

design...