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Policy routing in Internet protocols (RFC1102)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000001911D
Original Publication Date: 1989-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Sep-12
Document File: 19 page(s) / 55K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

D.D. Clark: AUTHOR

Abstract

An integral component of the Internet protocols is the routing function, which determines the series of networks and gateways a packet will traverse in passing from the source to the destination. Although there have been a number of routing protocols used in the Internet, they share the idea that one route should be selected out of all available routes based on minimizing some measure of the route, such as delay. Recently, it has become important to select routes in order to restrict the use of network resources to certain classes of customers. These considerations, which are usually described as resource policies, are poorly enforced by the existing technology in the Internet. This document proposes an approach to integrating policy controls into the Internet.

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Network Working Group D. Clark

Request for Comments: 1102 M.I.T. Laboratory for Computer Science

May 1989

Policy Routing in Internet Protocols

1. Status of this Memo

The purpose of this RFC is to focus discussion on particular problems

in the Internet and possible methods of solution. No proposed

solutions in this document are intended as standards for the

Internet. Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

2. Introduction

An integral component of the Internet protocols is the routing

function, which determines the series of networks and gateways a

packet will traverse in passing from the source to the destination.

Although there have been a number of routing protocols used in the

Internet, they share the idea that one route should be selected out

of all available routes based on minimizing some measure of the

route, such as delay. Recently, it has become important to select

routes in order to restrict the use of network resources to certain

classes of customers. These considerations, which are usually

described as resource policies, are poorly enforced by the existing

technology in the Internet. This document proposes an approach to

integrating policy controls into the Internet.

I assume that the resources of the Internet: networks, links, and

gateways, are partitioned into Administrative Regions or ARs. Each

AR is governed by a somewhat autonomous administration, with distinct

goals as to the class of customers it intends to serve, the qualities

of service it intends to deliver, and the means for recovering its

cost. To construct a route across the Internet, a sequence of ARs

must be selected that collectively supply a path from the source to

the destination. This sequence of ARs will be called a Policy Route,

or PR. Each AR through which a Policy Route passes will be concerned

that the PR has been properly constructed. To this end, each AR may

wish to insure that the user of the PR is authorized, the requested

quality of service is supported, and that the cost of the service can

be recovered.

In the abstract, a Policy Route is a series of ARs, which are assumed

to be named with globally distinct identifiers. (The requirement for

global names for ARs suggests that the name space of ARs is flat.

That simplifying assumption is made in this RFC, but it should be

possible to extend the scheme described here to permit nesting of ARs

to reduce the amount of global information. The problem of adding

structure to the space of ARs is an exercise for later study.)

Before a PR can be used, however, it must be reduced to more concrete

terms; a series of gateways which connect the sequence of ARs. These

gateways will be called Policy Gateways.

Presently, the closest mechanism to policy routing in the Internet is

EGP, the Exterior Gateway Prot...