Browse Prior Art Database

Policy requirements for inter Administrative Domain routing (RFC1125)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000001935D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2001-Oct-24
Document File: 22 page(s) / 54K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

D. Estrin: AUTHOR

Abstract

Efforts are now underway to develop a new generation of routing protocol that will allow each Administrative Domain (AD) in the growing Internet (and internets in general) to independently express and enforce policies regarding the flow of packets to, from, and through its resources. (FOOTNOTE 1: The material presented here incorporates discussions held with members of the IAB Autonomous Networks Research Group and the Open Routing Working Group.) This document articulates the requirements for policy based routing and should be used as input to the functional specification and evaluation of proposed protocols.

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Network Working Group                                          D. Estrin

Request for Comments:  1125              USC Computer Science Department

                                                           November 1989

      POLICY REQUIREMENTS FOR INTER ADMINISTRATIVE DOMAIN ROUTING

1  STATUS OF THIS MEMO

   The purpose of this memo is to focus discussion on particular

   problems in the Internet and possible methods of solution.  No

   proposed solutions in this document are intended as standards for the

   Internet.  Rather, it is hoped that a general consensus will emerge

   as to the appropriate solution to such problems, leading eventually

   to the development and adoption of standards.  Distribution of this

   memo is unlimited.

2  ABSTRACT

   Efforts are now underway to develop a new generation of routing

   protocol that will allow each Administrative Domain (AD) in the

   growing Internet (and internets in general) to independently express

   and enforce policies regarding the flow of packets to, from, and

   through its resources. (FOOTNOTE 1: The material presented here

   incorporates discussions held with members of the IAB Autonomous

   Networks Research Group and the Open Routing Working Group.)  This

   document articulates the requirements for policy based routing and

   should be used as input to the functional specification and

   evaluation of proposed protocols.

   Two critical assumptions will shape the type of routing mechanism

   that is devised: (1) the topological organization of ADs, and (2) the

   type and variability of policies expressed by ADs.  After justifying

   our assumptions regarding AD topology we present a taxonomy, and

   specific examples, of policies that must be supported by a PR

   protocol.  We conclude with a brief discussion of policy routing

   mechanisms proposed in previous RFCs (827, 1102, 1104, 1105).  Future

   RFCs will elaborate on the architecture and protocols needed to

   support the requirements presented here.

3  BACKGROUND

   The Research Internet has evolved from a single backbone wide area

   network with many connected campus networks, to an internet with

   multiple cross-country backbones, regional access networks, and a

   profusion of campus networks. (FOOTNOTE 2: The term Research Internet

   refers to a collection of government, university, and some private

   company, networks that are used by researchers to access shared

Estrin                                                          [Page 1]

RFC 1125                  Policy Requirements              November 1989

   computing resources (e.g., supercomputers), and for research related

   information exchange (e.g., distribution of software, technical

   documents, and email). The networks that make up the Research

   Internet run the DOD Internet Protocol [1].)  At times during its

   development the Research Internet topology appeared somewhat chaotic.

   Overlapping facilities and lateral (as opposed to hierarchical)

   connections seemed to be the rule rather than the exception.  Today

   the Research Internet topology is becoming more regular through

   coordination of agency investment and adoption of a hierarchy similar

   to that of the telephone networks'.  The result is several

   overlapping wide area backbones connected to regional networks, which

   in...