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Message Posting Protocol (MPP) (RFC1204)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000002018D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Sep-12
Document File: 5 page(s) / 10K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

D. Lee: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Operating systems for personal computers do not provide a mechanism for user authentication. However, such a mechanism is crucial for electronic mail system since authenticating message sender's identity is important in preventing mail forgery. Hence, adding personal computers to an electronic mail network requires an agent (message posting server) to authenticate sender's identity and then submit mail to the message delivery system (e.g., Sendmail, MMDF) on behalf of the sender at a PC. The Netix Message Posting Protocol is developed to be the interface between the message posting server and the PC (client). The protocol is designed to use TCP and is based on the command and reply structures defined for Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (RFC 821) and File Transfer Protocol (RFC 959).

This text was extracted from a ASCII Text document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 29% of the total text.

Network Working Group S. Yeh

Request for Comments: 1204 D. Lee

Netix Communications, Inc.

February 1991

Message Posting Protocol (MPP)

Status of this Memo

This memo describes a protocol for posting messages from workstations

(e.g., PCs) to a mail service host. This RFC specifies an

Experimental Protocol for the Internet community. Discussion and

suggestions for improvement are requested. Please refer to the

current edition of the "IAB Official Protocol Standards" for the

standardization state and status of this protocol. Distribution of

this memo is unlimited.

1. INTRODUCTION

Operating systems for personal computers do not provide a mechanism

for user authentication. However, such a mechanism is crucial for

electronic mail system since authenticating message sender's identity

is important in preventing mail forgery. Hence, adding personal

computers to an electronic mail network requires an agent (message

posting server) to authenticate sender's identity and then submit

mail to the message delivery system (e.g., Sendmail, MMDF) on behalf

of the sender at a PC. The Netix Message Posting Protocol is

developed to be the interface between the message posting server and

the PC (client). The protocol is designed to use TCP and is based on

the command and reply structures defined for Simple Mail Transfer

Protocol (RFC 821) and File Transfer Protocol (RFC 959).

2. SPECIFICATIONS

2.1. Command List

USER

PASS

DATA

NOOP

QUIT

2.2. Reply List

220 Message Posting Service Ready.

221 Closing Connection.

250 Command OK.

354 Enter mail, end with .

451 Local error encountered.

500 Command unrecognized.

501 Argument syntax error.

503 Illegal command sequence.

530 Authentication Failure.

550 Error.

2.3. Command and Reply Descriptions

USER

The USER command informs the message posting server about the

username of the user trying to submit mail to the network. The

required argument for the USER command is a string specifying

the message sender's username.

The USER command can only be used under three conditions:

- when the session with the message posting server has just

started;

- right after a message text (terminated by the "."

sequence) has been successfully submitted to the message

posting server;

- right after a USER command that gets the reply code 501.

List of possible reply codes for the USER command:

- 250 The username of the message sender has been accepted.

- 451 Internal error has occurred in the message ...