Browse Prior Art Database

Gateway Congestion Control Survey (RFC1254)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000002071D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Sep-12
Document File: 22 page(s) / 64K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

A. Mankin: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The growth of network intensive Internet applications has made gateway congestion control a high priority. The IETF Performance and Congestion Control Working Group surveyed and reviewed gateway congestion control and avoidance approaches. The purpose of this paper is to present our review of the congestion control approaches, as a way of encouraging new discussion and experimentation. Included in the survey are Source Quench, Random Drop, Congestion Indication (DEC Bit), and Fair Queueing. The task remains for Internet implementors to determine and agree on the most effective mechanisms for controlling gateway congestion.

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Network Working Group A. Mankin

Request for Comments: 1254 MITRE

K. Ramakrishnan

Digital Equipment Corporation

Editors

August 1991

Gateway Congestion Control Survey

Status of this Memo

This memo provides information for the Internet community. It is a

survey of some of the major directions and issues. It does not

specify an Internet standard. Distribution of this memo is

unlimited.

Abstract

The growth of network intensive Internet applications has made

gateway congestion control a high priority. The IETF Performance and

Congestion Control Working Group surveyed and reviewed gateway

congestion control and avoidance approaches. The purpose of this

paper is to present our review of the congestion control approaches,

as a way of encouraging new discussion and experimentation. Included

in the survey are Source Quench, Random Drop, Congestion Indication

(DEC Bit), and Fair Queueing. The task remains for Internet

implementors to determine and agree on the most effective mechanisms

for controlling gateway congestion.

1. Introduction

Internet users regularly encounter congestion, often in mild forms.

However, severe congestion episodes have been reported also; and

gateway congestion remains an obstacle for Internet applications such

as scientific supercomputing data transfer. The need for Internet

congestion control originally became apparent during several periods

of 1986 and 1987, when the Internet experienced the "congestion

collapse" condition predicted by Nagle [Nag84]. A large number of

widely dispersed Internet sites experienced simultaneous slowdown or

cessation of networking services for prolonged periods. BBN, the

firm responsible for maintaining the then backbone of the Internet,

the ARPANET, responded to the collapse by adding link capacity

[Gar87].

Much of the Internet now uses as a transmission backbone the National

Science Foundation Network (NSFNET). Extensive monitoring and

capacity planning are being done for the NSFNET backbone; still, as

the demand for this capacity grows, and as resource-intensive

applications such as wide-area file system management [Sp89]

increasingly use the backbone, effective congestion control policies

will be a critical requirement.

Only a few mechanisms currently exist in Internet hosts ...