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Guidelines for the Secure Operation of the Internet (RFC1281)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000002100D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Sep-12
Document File: 8 page(s) / 21K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

R. Pethia: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

These guidelines address the entire Internet community, consisting of users, hosts, local, regional, domestic and international backbone networks, and vendors who supply operating systems, routers, network management tools, workstations and other network components.

This text was extracted from a ASCII Text document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 14% of the total text.

Network Working Group R. Pethia

Request for Comments: 1281 Software Engineering Institute

S. Crocker

Trusted Information Systems, Inc.

B. Fraser

Software Engineering Institute

November 1991

Guidelines for the Secure Operation of the Internet

Status of this Memo

This memo provides information for the Internet community. It does

not specify an Internet standard. Distribution of this memo is

unlimited.

Preamble

The purpose of this document is to provide a set of guidelines to aid

in the secure operation of the Internet. During its history, the

Internet has grown significantly and is now quite diverse. Its

participants include government institutions and agencies, academic

and research institutions, commercial network and electronic mail

carriers, non-profit research centers and an increasing array of

industrial organizations who are primarily users of the technology.

Despite this dramatic growth, the system is still operated on a

purely collaborative basis. Each participating network takes

responsibility for its own operation. Service providers, private

network operators, users and vendors all cooperate to keep the system

functioning.

It is important to recognize that the voluntary nature of the

Internet system is both its strength and, perhaps, its most fragile

aspect. Rules of operation, like the rules of etiquette, are

voluntary and, largely, unenforceable, except where they happen to

coincide with national laws, violation of which can lead to

prosecution. A common set of rules for the successful and

increasingly secure operation of the Internet can, at best, be

voluntary, since the laws of various countries are not uniform

regarding data networking. Indeed, the guidelines outlined below

also can be only voluntary. However, since joining the Internet is

optional, it is also fair to argue that any Internet rules of

behavior are part of the bargain for joining and that failure to

observe them, apart from any legal infrastructure available, are

grounds for sanctions.

Introduction

These guidelines address the entire Internet community, consisting of

users, hosts, local, regional, domestic and international backbone

networks, and vendors who supply operating systems, routers, network

management tools, workstations and other network components.

Security is understood to include protection of the privacy of

information, protection of information against unauthorized

modification, protection of systems against denial of service, and

protection of systems against unauthorized access.

These guidelines encompass six main points. These points are

repeated ...