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The Internet Gopher Protocol (a distributed document search and retrieval protocol) (RFC1436)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000002264D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Sep-12
Document File: 14 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

F. Anklesaria: AUTHOR [+6]

Abstract

The Internet Gopher protocol is designed for distributed document search and retrieval. This document describes the protocol, lists some of the implementations currently available, and has an overview of how to implement new client and server applications. This document is adapted from the basic Internet Gopher protocol document first issued by the Microcomputer Center at the University of Minnesota in 1991.

This text was extracted from a ASCII Text document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 9% of the total text.

Network Working Group F. Anklesaria

Request for Comments: 1436 M. McCahill

P. Lindner

D. Johnson

D. Torrey

B. Alberti

University of Minnesota

March 1993

The Internet Gopher Protocol

(a distributed document search and retrieval protocol)

Status of this Memo

This memo provides information for the Internet community. It does

not specify an Internet standard. Distribution of this memo is

unlimited.

Abstract

The Internet Gopher protocol is designed for distributed document

search and retrieval. This document describes the protocol, lists

some of the implementations currently available, and has an overview

of how to implement new client and server applications. This

document is adapted from the basic Internet Gopher protocol document

first issued by the Microcomputer Center at the University of

Minnesota in 1991.

Introduction

gopher n. 1. Any of various short tailed, burrowing mammals of the

family Geomyidae, of North America. 2. (Amer. colloq.) Native or

inhabitant of Minnesota: the Gopher State. 3. (Amer. colloq.) One

who runs errands, does odd-jobs, fetches or delivers documents for

office staff. 4. (computer tech.) software following a simple

protocol for burrowing through a TCP/IP internet.

The Internet Gopher protocol and software follow a client-server

model. This protocol assumes a reliable data stream; TCP is assumed.

Gopher servers should listen on port 70 (port 70 is assigned to

Internet Gopher by IANA). Documents reside on many autonomous

servers on the Internet. Users run client software on their desktop

systems, connecting to a server and sending the server a selector (a

line of text, which may be empty) via a TCP connection at a well-

known port. The server responds with a block of text terminated by a

period on a line by itself and closes the connection. No state is

retained by the server.

While documents (and services) reside on many servers, Gopher client

software presents users with a hierarchy of items and directories

much like a file system. The Gopher interface is designed to

resemble a file system since a file system is a good model for

organizing documents and services; the user sees what amounts to one

big networked information system containing primarily document items,

directory items, and search items (the latter allowing searches for

documents across subsets of the information base).

Servers return either directory lists or documents. Each item in a

directory is identified by a type (the kind of object t...