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A Historical Perspective On The Usage Of IP Version 9 (RFC1606)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000002441D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Sep-12
Document File: 3 page(s) / 8K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

J. Onions: AUTHOR

Abstract

This paper reviews the usages of the old IP version protocol. It considers some of its successes and its failures.

This text was extracted from a ASCII document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 35% of the total text.

Network Working Group J. Onions

Request for Comments: 1606 Nexor Ltd.

Category: Informational 1 April 1994

A Historical Perspective On The Usage Of IP Version 9

Status of this Memo

This memo provides information for the Internet community. This memo

does not specify an Internet standard of any kind. Distribution of

this memo is unlimited.

Abstract

This paper reviews the usages of the old IP version protocol. It

considers some of its successes and its failures.

Introduction

The take-up of the network protocol TCP/IPv9 has been phenomenal over

the last few years. Gone are the days when there were just a few

million hosts, and the network was understood. As the IP version 9

protocol comes to the end of its useful life, once again due to

address space exhaustion, we look back at some of the success of the

protocol.

Routing

The up to 42 deep hierarchy of routing levels built into IPv9 must

have been one of the key features for its wide deployment. The

ability to assign a whole network, or group of networks to an

electronic component must be seen as one of the reasons for its

takeup. The use of the Compact Disk Hologram units is typical of the

usage. They typically have a level 37 network number assigned to each

logical part, and a level 36 network number assigned to the whole

device. This allows the CDH management protocol to control the unit

as a whole, and the high-street vendor to do remote diagnostics on

discreet elements of the device. This still allows sub-chip routing

to be done using the 38th level addressing to download new nanocode.

As yet, no requirement has been found for levels 40-42, with level 39

still being used for experimental interrogation of atomic structure

of components where required.

Allocation

The vast number space of the IPv9 protocol has also allowed

allocation to be done in a straight forward manner. Typically, most

high street commercial internet providers issue a range of 1 billion

addresses to each house. The addresses are then dynamically

partitioned into subnet hierarchies allowing groups of a million

addresses to be allocated for each discreet unit (e.g., room/floor

etc.) The allocation of sub groups then to controllers such as light

switches, mains sockets and similar is then done from each pool.

The allocation process is again done in a hierarchical zoned way,

with each major application requesting a block of addresses from its

controller. In this way the light bulb requests an address block fr...