Browse Prior Art Database

Multiprotocol Interoperability In IPng (RFC1683)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000002521D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Sep-12
Document File: 10 page(s) / 26K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

R. Clark: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This document was submitted to the IETF IPng area in response to RFC 1550. Publication of this document does not imply acceptance by the IPng area of any ideas expressed within. Comments should be submitted to the big-internet@munnari.oz.au mailing list.

This text was extracted from a ASCII document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 10% of the total text.

Network Working Group R. Clark

Request for Comments: 1683 M. Ammar

Category: Informational K. Calvert

Georgia Institute of Technology

August 1994

Multiprotocol Interoperability In IPng

Status of this Memo

This memo provides information for the Internet community. This memo

does not specify an Internet standard of any kind. Distribution of

this memo is unlimited.

Abstract

This document was submitted to the IETF IPng area in response to RFC

1550. Publication of this document does not imply acceptance by the

IPng area of any ideas expressed within. Comments should be

submitted to the big-internet@munnari.oz.au mailing list.

1. Executive Summary

The two most commonly cited issues motivating the introduction of

IPng are address depletion and routing table growth in IPv4. Further

motivation is the fact that the Internet is witnessing an increasing

diversity in the protocols and services found in the network. When

evaluating alternatives for IPng, we should consider how well each

alternative addresses the problems arising from this diversity. In

this document, we identify several features that affect a protocol's

ability to operate in a multiprotocol environment and propose the

incorporation of these features into IPng.

Our thesis, succinctly stated, is: The next generation Internet

Protocol should have features that support its use with a variety of

protocol architectures.

2. Introduction

The Internet is not a single protocol network [4]. While TCP/IP

remains the primary protocol suite, other protocols (e.g., IPX,

AppleTalk, OSI) exist either natively or encapsulated as data within

IP. As new protocols continue to be developed, we are likely to find

that a significant portion of the traffic in future networks is not

from single-protocol communications. It is important to recognize

that multiprotocol networking is not just a transition issue. For

instance, we will continue to see tunneling used to carry IPX traffic

over the Internet between two Novell networks. Furthermore, the

introduction of IPng is not going to result in a near term

elimination of IPv4. Even when IPng becomes the primary protocol

used in the Internet, there will still be IPv4 systems in use. We

should consider such multiprotocol uses of the network as we design

future protocols that can efficiently handle mixed protocol traffic.

We have identif...