Browse Prior Art Database

A Large Corporate User's View of IPng (RFC1687)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000002525D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Sep-12
Document File: 11 page(s) / 32K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

E. Fleischman: AUTHOR

Abstract

This document was submitted to the IETF IPng area in response to RFC 1550. Publication of this document does not imply acceptance by the IPng area of any ideas expressed within. Comments should be submitted to the big-internet@munnari.oz.au mailing list.

This text was extracted from a ASCII document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 9% of the total text.

Network Working Group E. Fleischman

Request for Comments: 1687 Boeing Computer Services

Category: Informational August 1994

A Large Corporate User's View of IPng

Status of this Memo

This memo provides information for the Internet community. This memo

does not specify an Internet standard of any kind. Distribution of

this memo is unlimited.

Abstract

This document was submitted to the IETF IPng area in response to RFC

1550. Publication of this document does not imply acceptance by the

IPng area of any ideas expressed within. Comments should be

submitted to the big-internet@munnari.oz.au mailing list.

Disclaimer and Acknowledgments

Much of this draft has been adapted from the article "A User's View

of IPng" by Eric Fleischman which was published in the September 1993

edition of ConneXions Magazine (Volume 7, Number 9, pages 36 - 40).

The original ConneXions article represented an official position of

The Boeing Company on IPng issues. This memo is an expansion of that

original treatment. This version also represents a Boeing corporate

opinion which we hope will be helpful to the on-going IPng

discussions. An assumption of this paper is that other Fortune 100

companies which have non-computing-related products and services will

tend to have a viewpoint about IPng which is similar to the one

presented by this paper.

Executive Summary

Key points:

1) Large corporate users generally view IPng with disfavor.

2) Industry and the IETF community have very different values

and viewpoints which lead to orthogonal assessments concerning

the desirability of deploying IPng.

3) This paper provides insight into the mindset of a large

corporate user concerning the relevant issues surrounding an

IPng deployment. The bottom line is that a new deployment of

IPng runs counter to several business drivers. A key point to

highlight is that end users actually buy applications -- not

networking technologies.

4) There are really only two compelling reasons for a large end

user to deploy IPng:

A) The existence of must-have products which are tightly coupled

with IPng.

B) Receipt of a command to deploy IPng from senior management.

The former would probably be a function of significant

technological advances. The latter probably would be a

function of a convergence of IPng with International

Standards (OSI).

5) Five end user requirements for IPng are pres...