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Six Virtual Inches to the Left: The Problem with IPng (RFC1705)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000002544D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Sep-12
Document File: 22 page(s) / 61K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

R. Carlson: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This document was submitted to the IETF IPng area in response to RFC 1550. Publication of this document does not imply acceptance by the IPng area of any ideas expressed within. Comments should be submitted to the big-internet@munnari.oz.au mailing list.

This text was extracted from a ASCII document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 4% of the total text.

Network Working Group: R. Carlson

Request for Comments: 1705 ANL

Category: Informational D. Ficarella

Motorola

October 1994

Six Virtual Inches to the Left:

The Problem with IPng

Status of this Memo

This memo provides information for the Internet community. This memo

does not specify an Internet standard of any kind. Distribution of

this memo is unlimited.

Abstract

This document was submitted to the IETF IPng area in response to RFC

1550. Publication of this document does not imply acceptance by the

IPng area of any ideas expressed within. Comments should be

submitted to the big-internet@munnari.oz.au mailing list.

Overview

This RFC suggests that a new version of TCP (TCPng), and UDP, be

developed and deployed. It proposes that a globally unique address

(TA) be assigned to Transport layer protocol (TCP/UDP). The purpose

of this TA is to uniquely identify an Internet node without

specifying any routing information. A new version of TCP, and UDP,

will need to be developed describing the new header fields and

formats. This new version of TCP would contain support for high

bandwidth-delay networks. Support for multiple network layer

(Internet Protocol) protocols is also possible with this new TCP.

Assigning an address to TCP/UDP would allow for the support of

multiple network layer protocols (IPng's). The TA would identify the

location of an Internet node. The IPng layer would provide routing

information to the Internet. Separating the location and routing

functions will greatly increase the versatility of the Internet.

Table of Contents

1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

2. Historical perspective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

2.1 OSI and the 7 layer model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

2.2 Internet Evolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

2.3 The Reasons for Change . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

2.3.1 Class-B Address Exhaustion . . . . . . . . . . . 4

2.3.2 Routing Table Growth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

3. The Problems with Change . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

3.1 TCP/UDP Implementations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

3.2 User Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

3.3 The Entrenched Masses . . . . . . . . . . . ...