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CATNIP: Common Architecture for the Internet (RFC1707)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000002546D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Sep-12
Document File: 13 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

M. McGovern: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This document was submitted to the IETF IPng area in response to RFC 1550 Publication of this document does not imply acceptance by the IPng area of any ideas expressed within. Comments should be submitted to the big-internet@munnari.oz.au mailing list.

This text was extracted from a ASCII Text document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 8% of the total text.

Network Working Group: M. McGovern

Request for Comments: 1707 Sunspot Graphics

Category: Informational R. Ullmann

Lotus Development Corporation

October 1994

CATNIP: Common Architecture for the Internet

Status of this Memo

This memo provides information for the Internet community. This memo

does not specify an Internet standard of any kind. Distribution of

this memo is unlimited.

Abstract

This document was submitted to the IETF IPng area in response to RFC

1550 Publication of this document does not imply acceptance by the

IPng area of any ideas expressed within. Comments should be

submitted to the big-internet@munnari.oz.au mailing list.

Executive Summary

This paper describes a common architecture for the network layer

protocol. The Common Architecture for Next Generation Internet

Protocol (CATNIP) provides a compressed form of the existing network

layer protocols. Each compression is defined so that the resulting

network protocol data units are identical in format. The fixed part

of the compressed format is 16 bytes in length, and may often be the

only part transmitted on the subnetwork.

With some attention paid to details, it is possible for a transport

layer protocol (such as TCP) to operate properly with one end system

using one network layer (e.g. IP version 4) and the other using some

other network protocol, such as CLNP. Using the CATNIP definitions,

all the existing transport layer protocols used on connectionless

network services will operate over any existing network layer

protocol.

The CATNIP uses cache handles to provide both rapid identification of

the next hop in high performance routing as well as abbreviation of

the network header by permitting the addresses to be omitted when a

valid cache handle is available. The fixed part of the network layer

header carries the cache handles.

The cache handles are either provided by feedback from the downstream

router in response to offered traffic, or explicitly provided as part

of the establishment of a circuit or flow through the network. When

used for flows, the handle is the locally significant flow

identifier.

When used for circuits, the handle is the layer 3 peer-to-peer

logical channel identifier, and permits a full implementation of

network-layer connection-oriented service if the routers along the

path provide sufficient features. At the same time, the packet format

of the connectionless service is retained, and hop by hop fully

addressed datagrams can be used at the same time. Any intermediate

model between the connection oriented and the connectionless service

can thus be provided over cooperating routers.

CATNIP Objectives

The first objective of the CATNIP is a practical recognition of the

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