Browse Prior Art Database

K-12 Internetworking Guidelines (RFC1709)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000002548D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2001-Nov-12
Document File: 27 page(s) / 67K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

J. Gargano: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Many organizations concerned with K-12 educational issues and the planning for the use of technology recognize the value of data communications throughout the educational system. State sponsored documents such as the California Department of Education's "Strategic Plan for Information Technology" recommend the planning of voice, video and data networks to support learning and educational administration, but they do not provide specific technical direction.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 5% of the total text.

Network Working Group                                         J. Gargano

Request for Comments: 1709               University of California, Davis

FYI: 26                                                        D. Wasley

Category: Informational               University of California, Berkeley

                                                           November 1994

                    K-12 Internetworking Guidelines

Status Of This Memo

   This memo provides information for the Internet community.  This memo

   does not specify an Internet standard of any kind.  Distribution of

   this memo is unlimited.

I.  Introduction

   Many organizations concerned with K-12 educational issues and the

   planning for the use of technology recognize the value of data

   communications throughout the educational system.  State sponsored

   documents such as the California Department of Education's "Strategic

   Plan for Information Technology" recommend the planning of voice,

   video and data networks to support learning and educational

   administration, but they do not provide specific technical direction.

   The institutions that built the Internet and connected early in its

   development are early adopters of technology, with technical staff

   dedicated to the planning for and implementation of leading edge

   technology.  The K-12 community traditionally has not had this level

   of staffing available for telecommunications planning.  This document

   is intended to bridge that gap and provides a recommended technical

   direction, an introduction to the role the Internet now plays in K-12

   education and technical guidelines for building a campus data

   communications infrastructure that provides internetworking services

   and connections to the Internet.

   For a more general introduction to the Internet and its applications

   and uses, the reader is referred to any of the references listed in

   the following RFCs:

   1392    "Internet Users' Glossary" (also FYI 18)

   1432    "Recent Internet Books"

   1462    "What is the Internet" (also FYI 20)

   1463    "Introducing the Internet - A Short Bibliograpy of

           Introductory Internetworking on Readings for the Network

           Novice" (also FYI 19)

ISN Working Group                                               [Page 1]

RFC 1709            K-12 Internetworking Guidelines        November 1994

II.  Rationale for the Use of Internet Protocols

   In 1993, the Bank Street College of Education conducted a survey of

   550 educators who are actively involved in using telecommunications.

   (Honey, Margaret, Henriquez, Andres, "Telecommunications and K-12

   Educators: Findings from a National Survey," Bank Street College of

   Education, New York, NY, 1993.)  The survey looked at a wide variety

   of ways telecommunications technology is used in K-12 education.

   Their findings on Internet usage are summarized below.

        "Slightly less than half of these educators have access

        to the Internet, which is supplied most frequently by a

        university computer or educational service."

        "Internet services are used almost twice as often for

        professional activities as for student learning

        activities."

        "Sending e-mail is the most common use of the Internet,

        followed by accessing news and bulletin boards and gaining

        access to remote computers."

   The following chart shows the percentage of respondents that use each

   n...