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IP Encapsulation within IP (RFC2003)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000002557D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Sep-13
Document File: 11 page(s) / 28K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

C. Perkins: AUTHOR

Abstract

This document specifies a method by which an IP datagram may be encapsulated (carried as payload) within an IP datagram. Encapsulation is suggested as a means to alter the normal IP routing for datagrams, by delivering them to an intermediate destination that would otherwise not be selected by the (network part of the) IP Destination Address field in the original IP header. Encapsulation may serve a variety of purposes, such as delivery of a datagram to a mobile node using Mobile IP.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 10% of the total text.

Network Working Group C. Perkins

Request for Comment: 2003 IBM

Category: Standards Track October 1996

IP Encapsulation within IP

Status of This Memo

This document specifies an Internet standards track protocol for the

Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for

improvements. Please refer to the current edition of the "Internet

Official Protocol Standards" (STD 1) for the standardization state

and status of this protocol. Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Abstract

This document specifies a method by which an IP datagram may be

encapsulated (carried as payload) within an IP datagram.

Encapsulation is suggested as a means to alter the normal IP routing

for datagrams, by delivering them to an intermediate destination that

would otherwise not be selected by the (network part of the) IP

Destination Address field in the original IP header. Encapsulation

may serve a variety of purposes, such as delivery of a datagram to a

mobile node using Mobile IP.

1. Introduction

This document specifies a method by which an IP datagram may be

encapsulated (carried as payload) within an IP datagram.

Encapsulation is suggested as a means to alter the normal IP routing

for datagrams, by delivering them to an intermediate destination that

would otherwise not be selected based on the (network part of the) IP

Destination Address field in the original IP header. Once the

encapsulated datagram arrives at this intermediate destination node,

it is decapsulated, yielding the original IP datagram, which is then

delivered to the destination indicated by the original Destination

Address field. This use of encapsulation and decapsulation of a

datagram is frequently referred to as "tunneling" the datagram, and

the encapsulator and decapsulator are then considered to be the

"endpoints" of the tunnel.

In the most general tunneling case we have

source ---> encapsulator --------> decapsulator ---> destination

with the source, encapsulator, decapsulator, and destination being

separate nodes. The encapsulator node is considered the "entry

point" of the tunnel, and the decapsulator node is considered the

"exit point" of the tunnel. There in general may be multiple

source-destination pairs using the same tunnel between the

encapsulator and decapsulator.

2. Motivation

The Mobile IP working group has specified the use of encapsulation as

a way to deliver datagrams from a mobile node's "home network" to an

agent th...