Browse Prior Art Database

Source Directed Access Control on the Internet (RFC2057)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000002608D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Sep-13
Document File: 17 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

S. Bradner: AUTHOR

Abstract

This memo was developed from a deposition that I submitted as part of a challenge to the Communications Decency Act of 1996, part of the Telecommunications Reform Act of 1996. The Telecommunications Reform Act is a U.S. federal law substantially changing the regulatory structure in the United States in the telecommunications arena. The Communications Decency Act (CDA) part of this law has as its aim the desire to protect minors from some of the material carried over telecommunications networks. In particular the law requires that the sender of potentially offensive material take "effective action" to ensure that it is not presented to minors. A number of people have requested that I publish the deposition as an informational RFC since some of the information in it may be useful where descriptions of the way the Internet and its applications work could help clear up confusion in the technical feasibility of proposed content control regulations.

This text was extracted from a ASCII Text document.
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Network Working Group S. Bradner

Request for Comments: 2057 Harvard University

Category: Informational November 1996

Source Directed Access Control on the Internet

Status of this Memo

This memo provides information for the Internet community. This memo

does not specify an Internet standard of any kind. Distribution of

this memo is unlimited.

1. Abstract

This memo was developed from a deposition that I submitted as part of

a challenge to the Communications Decency Act of 1996, part of the

Telecommunications Reform Act of 1996. The Telecommunications Reform

Act is a U.S. federal law substantially changing the regulatory

structure in the United States in the telecommunications arena. The

Communications Decency Act (CDA) part of this law has as its aim the

desire to protect minors from some of the material carried over

telecommunications networks. In particular the law requires that the

sender of potentially offensive material take "effective action" to

ensure that it is not presented to minors. A number of people have

requested that I publish the deposition as an informational RFC since

some of the information in it may be useful where descriptions of the

way the Internet and its applications work could help clear up

confusion in the technical feasibility of proposed content control

regulations.

2. Control and oversight over the Internet

No organization or entity operates or controls the Internet. The

Internet consists of tens of thousands of local networks linking

millions of computers, owned by governments, public institutions,

non-profit organizations, and private companies around the world.

These local networks are linked together by thousands of Internet

service providers which interconnect at dozens of points throughout

the world. None of these entities, however, controls the Internet;

each entity only controls its own computers and computer networks,

and the links allowed into those computers and computer networks.

Although no organizations control the Internet, a limited number of

organizations are responsible for the development of communications

and operational standards and protocols used on the Internet. These

standards and protocols are what allow the millions of different (and

sometimes incompatible) computers worldwide to communicate with each

other. These standards and protocols are not imposed on any computer

or computer network, but any computer or computer network must follow

at least some of the standards and protocols to be able to

communicate with other computers over the Internet.

The most significant of the organizations involved in defining these

standards include the Internet Society (ISOC), the Internet

Architecture Board (IAB), Internet Engineering Steering Group (IESG),

and the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF). The ...