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Cisco Systems' Tag Switching Architecture Overview (RFC2105)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000002659D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Sep-13
Document File: 11 page(s) / 31K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

Y. Rekhter: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

This document provides an overview of a novel approach to network layer packet forwarding, called tag switching. The two main components of the tag switching architecture - forwarding and control - are described. Forwarding is accomplished using simple label-swapping techniques, while the existing network layer routing protocols plus mechanisms for binding and distributing tags are used for control. Tag switching can retain the scaling properties of IP, and can help improve the scalability of IP networks. While tag switching does not rely on ATM, it can straightforwardly be applied to ATM switches. A range of tag switching applications and deployment scenarios are described.

This text was extracted from a ASCII document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 9% of the total text.

Network Working Group Y. Rekhter

Request for Comments: 2105 B. Davie

Category: Informational D. Katz

E. Rosen

G. Swallow

Cisco Systems, Inc.

February 1997

Cisco Systems' Tag Switching Architecture Overview

Status of this Memo

This memo provides information for the Internet community. This memo

does not specify an Internet standard of any kind. Distribution of

this memo is unlimited.

IESG Note:

This protocol is NOT the product of an IETF working group nor is it a

standards track document. It has not necessarily benefited from the

widespread and in depth community review that standards track

documents receive.

Abstract

This document provides an overview of a novel approach to network

layer packet forwarding, called tag switching. The two main

components of the tag switching architecture - forwarding and

control - are described. Forwarding is accomplished using simple

label-swapping techniques, while the existing network layer routing

protocols plus mechanisms for binding and distributing tags are used

for control. Tag switching can retain the scaling properties of IP,

and can help improve the scalability of IP networks. While tag

switching does not rely on ATM, it can straightforwardly be applied

to ATM switches. A range of tag switching applications and deployment

scenarios are described.

Table of Contents

1 Introduction ........................................... 2

2 Tag Switching components ............................... 3

3 Forwarding component ................................... 3

3.1 Tag encapsulation ...................................... 4

4 Control component ...................................... 4

4.1 Destination-based routing .............................. 5

4.2 Hierarchy of routing knowledge ......................... 7

4.3 Multicast .............................................. 8

4.4 Flexible routing (explicit routes) ..................... 9

5 Tag switching with ATM ................................. 9

6 Quality of service ..................................... 11

7 Tag switching migration strategies ..................... 11

8 Summary ................................................ 12

9 Sec...