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Data Link Switching Remote Access Protocol (RFC2106)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000002660D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Sep-13
Document File: 15 page(s) / 38K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

S. Chiang: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This memo describes the Data Link Switching Remote Access Protocol that is used between workstations and routers to transport SNA/ NetBIOS traffic over TCP sessions. Any questions or comments should be sent to drap@cisco.com.

This text was extracted from a ASCII Text document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 8% of the total text.

Network Working Group S. Chiang

Request for Comments: 2106 J. Lee

Category: Informational Cisco Systems, Inc.

H. Yasuda

Mitsubishi Electric Corp.

February 1997

Data Link Switching Remote Access Protocol

Status of this Memo

This memo provides information for the Internet community. This memo

does not specify an Internet standard of any kind. Distribution of

this memo is unlimited.

Abstract

This memo describes the Data Link Switching Remote Access Protocol

that is used between workstations and routers to transport SNA/

NetBIOS traffic over TCP sessions. Any questions or comments should

be sent to drap@cisco.com.

1. Introduction

Since the Data Link Switching Protocol, RFC 1795, was published, some

software vendors have begun implementing DLSw on workstations. The

implementation of DLSw on a large number of workstations raises

several important issues that must be addressed. Scalability is the

major concern. For example, the number of TCP sessions to the DLSw

router increases in direct proportion to the number of workstations

added. Another concern is efficiency. Since DLSw is a switch-to-

switch protocol, it is not efficient when implemented on

workstations.

DRAP addresses the above issues. It introduces a hierarchical

structure to resolve the scalability problems. All workstations are

clients to the router (server) rather than peers to the router. This

creates a client/server model. It also provides a more efficient

protocol between the workstation (client) and the router (server).

2. Overview

2.1. DRAP Client/Server Model

+-----------+ +-----------+ +---------+

| Mainframe | | IP Router +- ppp -+ DLSw |

+--+--------+ +-----+-----+ | Work |

| | | Station |

| | +---------+

+--+--+ +-------------+ |

| FEP +- TR -+ DLSw Router +-- IP Backbone

+-----+ +-------------+ |

|

|

+-----------+ +---------+

| IP Router +- ppp -+ DLSw |

+-----+-----+ | Work |

| Station |

+---------+

| DLSw Session |

+-------------------------------+

Figure 2-1. Running DLSw on a large number of workstations creates a

scalability problem.

Figure 2-1 shows a typical DLSw impleme...