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Service Location Protocol (RFC2165)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000002722D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Sep-13

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

J. Veizades: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

The Service Location Protocol provides a scalable framework for the discovery and selection of network services. Using this protocol, computers using the Internet no longer need so much static configuration of network services for network based applications. This is especially important as computers become more portable, and users less tolerant or able to fulfill the demands of network system administration.

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Network Working Group J. Veizades

Request for Comments: 2165 @Home Network

Category: Standards Track E. Guttman

C. Perkins

Sun Microsystems

S. Kaplan

June 1997

Service Location Protocol

Status of This Memo

This document specifies an Internet standards track protocol for the

Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for

improvements. Please refer to the current edition of the "Internet

Official Protocol Standards" (STD 1) for the standardization state

and status of this protocol. Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Abstract

The Service Location Protocol provides a scalable framework for the

discovery and selection of network services. Using this protocol,

computers using the Internet no longer need so much static

configuration of network services for network based applications.

This is especially important as computers become more portable, and

users less tolerant or able to fulfill the demands of network system

administration.

Table of Contents

1. Introduction 3

2. Terminology 3

2.1. Notation Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

2.2. Service Information and Predicate Representation . . . . 5

2.3. Specification Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

3. Protocol Overview 6

3.1. Protocol Transactions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

3.2. Schemes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

3.2.1. The "service:" URL scheme . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

3.3. Standard Attribute Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

3.4. Naming Authority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

3.5. Interpretation of Service Location Replies . . . . . . . 10

3.6. Use of TCP, UDP and Multicast in Service Location . . . . 10

3.6.1. Multicast vs. Broadcast . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

3.6.2. Service-Specific Multicast Address . . . . . . . 11

3.7. Service Location Scaling, and Multicast Operating Modes . 12

4. Service Location General Message Format 14

4.1. Use of Transaction IDs (XIDs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

4.2. URL Entries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

4.3. Authentication Blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

4.4. URL Entry Lifetime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

5. Service Request Message Format 19

5.1. Service Request Usage . . . . . . . . . . ...