Browse Prior Art Database

Telnet Com Port Control Option (RFC2217)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000002775D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Sep-13
Document File: 12 page(s) / 29K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

G. Clark: AUTHOR

Abstract

This memo proposes a protocol to allow greater use of modems attached to a network for outbound dialing purposes.

This text was extracted from a ASCII document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 9% of the total text.

Network Working Group G. Clark

Request for Comments: 2217 Cisco Systems, Inc.

Category: Experimental October 1997

Telnet Com Port Control Option

Status of this Memo

This memo defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet

community. This memo does not specify an Internet standard of any

kind. Discussion and suggestions for improvement are requested.

Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Introduction

This memo proposes a protocol to allow greater use of modems attached

to a network for outbound dialing purposes.

Table of Contents

1. Negotiation of the Com Port

Control Option Protocol .................. 5

2. Com Port Configuration Commands .................. 6

Version

Baud Rate

Data Bit Size

Parity

Stop Bit size

3. Special Com Port Control Commands ................. 8

XON/XOFF Flow Control

HARDWARE Flow Control

BREAK Signal

DTR Signal

RTS Signal

4. Notification of Com Port and .................. 12

Modem Line Changes

5. Flow Control .................. 13

6. Security Considerations .................. 13

7. Author's Address .................. 14

8. Reference Section .................. 14

Discussion

The Telnet protocol defines an interactive, character-oriented

communications session. It was originally designed to establish a

session between a client and a remote login service running on a host

[5].

Many new business functions require a person to connect to remote

services to retrieve or deposit information. By in large, these

remote services are accessed via an async dial up connection. This

new class of functions include:

- dial up connections to the Internet

- connecting to bulletin boards

- connecting to internal and external databases

- sending and receiving faxes.

The general nature of this new class of function requires an

interactive, character-oriented communications session via an async

modem. This is typically known as outbound modem dialing.

To help defer the cost of installing and maintaining additional phone

lines which may be used very little per person, many equipment

manufacturers have added the ability to establish a Telnet session

directly to the outbound ports on many of the most popular acces...