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Simple Hit-Metering and Usage-Limiting for HTTP (RFC2227)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000002785D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Sep-13
Document File: 31 page(s) / 79K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

J. Mogul: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This document proposes a simple extension to HTTP, using a new "Meter" header, which permits a limited form of demographic information (colloquially called "hit-counts") to be reported by caches to origin servers, in a more efficient manner than the "cache-busting" techniques currently used. It also permits an origin server to control the number of times a cache uses a cached response, and outlines a technique that origin servers can use to capture referral information without "cache-busting."

This text was extracted from a ASCII document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 3% of the total text.

Network Working Group J. Mogul

Request for Comments: 2227 DECWRL

Category: Standards Track P. Leach

Microsoft

October 1997

Simple Hit-Metering and Usage-Limiting for HTTP

Status of this Memo

This document specifies an Internet standards track protocol for the

Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for

improvements. Please refer to the current edition of the "Internet

Official Protocol Standards" (STD 1) for the standardization state

and status of this protocol. Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

Copyright (C) The Internet Society (1997). All Rights Reserved.

ABSTRACT

This document proposes a simple extension to HTTP, using a new

"Meter" header, which permits a limited form of demographic

information (colloquially called "hit-counts") to be reported by

caches to origin servers, in a more efficient manner than the

"cache-busting" techniques currently used. It also permits an origin

server to control the number of times a cache uses a cached response,

and outlines a technique that origin servers can use to capture

referral information without "cache-busting."

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1 Introduction 2

1.1 Goals, non-goals, and limitations 3

1.2 Brief summary of the design 4

1.3 Terminology 5

2 Overview 5

2.1 Discussion 7

3 Design concepts 8

3.1 Implementation of the "metering subtree" 8

3.2 Format of the Meter header 10

3.3 Negotiation of hit-metering and usage-limiting 10

3.4 Transmission of usage reports 14

3.5 When to send usage reports 15

3.6 Subdivision of usage-limits 16

4 Analysis 17

4.1 Approximation accuracy for counting users 18

4.2 What about "Network Computers"? 19

4.3 Critical-path delay analysis 19

5 Specification ...