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IANA Charset Registration Procedures (RFC2278)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000002839D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Sep-13
Document File: 8 page(s) / 17K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

N. Freed: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

MIME [RFC-2045, RFC-2046, RFC-2047, RFC-2184] and various other modern Internet protocols are capable of using many different charsets. This in turn means that the ability to label different charsets is essential. This registration procedure exists solely to associate a specific name or names with a given charset and to give an indication of whether or not a given charset can be used in MIME text objects. In particular, the general applicability and appropriateness of a given registered charset is a protocol issue, not a registration issue, and is not dealt with by this registration procedure.

This text was extracted from a ASCII document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 16% of the total text.

Network Working Group N. Freed

Request for Comments: 2278 Innosoft

BCP: 19 J. Postel

Category: Best Current Practice ISI

January 1998

IANA Charset

Registration Procedures

Status of this Memo

This document specifies an Internet Best Current Practices for the

Internet Community, and requests discussion and suggestions for

improvements. Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

Copyright (C) The Internet Society (1998). All Rights Reserved.

1. Abstract

MIME [RFC-2045, RFC-2046, RFC-2047, RFC-2184] and various other

modern Internet protocols are capable of using many different

charsets. This in turn means that the ability to label different

charsets is essential. This registration procedure exists solely to

associate a specific name or names with a given charset and to give

an indication of whether or not a given charset can be used in MIME

text objects. In particular, the general applicability and

appropriateness of a given registered charset is a protocol issue,

not a registration issue, and is not dealt with by this registration

procedure.

2. Definitions and Notation

The following sections define various terms used in this document.

2.1. Requirements Notation

This document occasionally uses terms that appear in capital letters.

When the terms "MUST", "SHOULD", "MUST NOT", "SHOULD NOT", and "MAY"

appear capitalized, they are being used to indicate particular

requirements of this specification. A discussion of the meanings of

these terms appears in [RFC-2119].

2.2. Character

A member of a set of elements used for the organisation, control, or

representation of data.

2.3. Charset

The term "charset" (see historical note below) is used here to refer

to a method of converting a sequence of octets into a sequence of

characters. This conversion may also optionally produce additional

control information such as directionality indicators.

Note that unconditional and unambiguous conversion in the other

direction is not required, in that not all characters may be

representable by a given charset and a charset may provide more than

one sequence of octets to represent a particular sequence of

characters.

This definition is intended to allow charsets to be defined in a

variety of different ways, from simple single-table mappings such as

US-ASCII...