Browse Prior Art Database

The text/css Media Type (RFC2318)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000002884D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Sep-13
Document File: 4 page(s) / 7K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

H. Lie: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) is a style sheet language for the World Wide Web. CSS style sheets have been in use since October 1995 using the Media Type text/css without registration; this memo seeks to regularize that position.

This text was extracted from a ASCII Text document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 42% of the total text.

Network Working Group H. Lie

Request for Comments: 2318 B. Bos

Category: Informational C. Lilley

W3C

March 1998

The text/css Media Type

Status of this Memo

This memo provides information for the Internet community. It does

not specify an Internet standard of any kind. Distribution of this

memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

Copyright (C) The Internet Society (1998). All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) is a style sheet language for the World

Wide Web. CSS style sheets have been in use since October 1995 using

the Media Type text/css without registration; this memo seeks to

regularize that position.

1. Introduction

The World Wide Web Consortium has issued a Recommendation [1], which

defines Cascading Style Sheets, level 1. This memo provides

information about the text/css Media Type.

2. Cascading Style Sheets

Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) is a style sheet language for the World

Wide Web. It describes the presentation (e.g. fonts, colors and

spacing) of structured documents. CSS is human readable and writable,

and expresses style in common desktop publishing terminology.

CSS style sheets have been in use since October 1995 using the Media

Type text/css without registration; this memo seeks to regularize

that position.

A CSS style sheet can be either:

(1) external - the style sheet is linked to a document through a

URI and exists as a separate object on the Web. The media type

text/css is used when fetching the object, for example in the

Content-Type and Accept header fields of HTTP [2].

(2) internal - the style sheet is contained within the document. A

typical scenario is an HTML [3] document that contains a style

sheet within the STYLE element. Due to this close relationship,

HTML and CSS share the same top-level name ("text").

4. Registration Information

To: ietf-types@iana.org

Subject: Registration of MIME media type text/css

MIME media type name: text

MIME subtype name: css

Required parameters: none

Optional parameters: charset

The syntax of CSS is expressed in US-ASCII, but a CSS file can

contain strings which may use any Unicode character. Any charset

that is a superset of US-ASCII may be used; US-ASCII, iso-8859-X

and utf-8 are recommended.

Encoding considerations:

For use with transports that are not 8-bit clean, quoted-

printable encoding is recommended since the majority of

characters will be CSS syntax and thus US-ASCII

Security considerations:

Applying a style sheet to a document may hide information

otherwise visible. For example, a very small font size may be

specified, or...