Browse Prior Art Database

Domain Names and Company Name Retrieval (RFC2345)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000002914D
Original Publication Date: 1998-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Sep-13
Document File: 12 page(s) / 28K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

J. Klensin: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Location of web information for particular companies based on their names has become an increasingly difficult problem as the Internet and the web grow. The use of a naming convention and the domain name system (DNS) for that purpose has caused complications for the latter while not solving the problem. While there have been several proposals to use contemporary, high-capability, directory service and search protocols to reduce the dependencies on DNS conventions, none of them have been significantly deployed.

This text was extracted from a ASCII Text document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 11% of the total text.

Network Working Group J. Klensin

Request for Comments: 2345 MCI

Category: Experimental T. Wolf

Dun & Bradstreet

G. Oglesby

MCI

May 1998

Domain Names and Company Name Retrieval

Status of this Memo

This memo defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet

community. It does not specify an Internet standard of any kind.

Discussion and suggestions for improvement are requested.

Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

Copyright (C) The Internet Society (1998). All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

Location of web information for particular companies based on their

names has become an increasingly difficult problem as the Internet

and the web grow. The use of a naming convention and the domain

name system (DNS) for that purpose has caused complications for the

latter while not solving the problem. While there have been several

proposals to use contemporary, high-capability, directory service and

search protocols to reduce the dependencies on DNS conventions, none

of them have been significantly deployed.

This document proposes a company name to URL mapping service based on

the oldest and least complex of Internet directory protocols, whois,

in order to explore whether an extremely simple and widely-deployed

protocol can succeed where more complex and powerful options have

failed or been excessively delayed.

1. Introduction and Context

In recent months, there have been many discussions in various

segments of the Internet community about "the top level domain

problem". Perhaps characteristically, that term is used by different

groups to identify different, and perhaps nearly orthogonal, issues.

Those issues include:

1.1. A "domain administration policy" issue.

1.2. A "name ownership" issue, of which the trademark issue may

constitute a special case.

1.3. An information location issue, specifically the problem of

locating the appropriate domain, or information tied to a

domain, for an entity given the name by which that entity is

usually known.

Of these, controversies about the first two may be inevitable

consequences of the growth of the Internet. There have been

intermittent difficulties with top level domain adminstration and

various attempts to use the domain registry function as a mechanism

for control of service providers or services from time to time since

a large number of such domains started being allocated. Those

problems led to the publication of the policy guidelines of

[RFC1591].

The third appears to be largely a consequence of the explosive growth

of ...