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DHCP Option for The Open Group's User Authentication Protocol (RFC2485)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000003065D
Original Publication Date: 1999-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Sep-13
Document File: 3 page(s) / 7K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

S. Drach: AUTHOR

Abstract

This document defines a DHCP [1] option that contains a list of pointers to User Authentication Protocol servers that provide user authentication services for clients that conform to The Open Group Network Computing Client Technical Standard [2].

This text was extracted from a ASCII document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 41% of the total text.

Network Working Group S. Drach

Request for Comments: 2485 Sun Microsystems

Category: Standards Track January 1999

DHCP Option for The Open Group's User Authentication Protocol

Status of this Memo

This document specifies an Internet standards track protocol for the

Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for

improvements. Please refer to the current edition of the "Internet

Official Protocol Standards" (STD 1) for the standardization state

and status of this protocol. Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

Copyright (C) The Internet Society (1999). All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

This document defines a DHCP [1] option that contains a list of

pointers to User Authentication Protocol servers that provide user

authentication services for clients that conform to The Open Group

Network Computing Client Technical Standard [2].

Introduction

The Open Group Network Computing Client Technical Standard, a product

of The Open Group's Network Computing Working Group (NCWG), defines a

network computing client user authentication facility named the User

Authentication Protocol (UAP).

UAP provides two levels of authentication, basic and secure. Basic

authentication uses the Basic Authentication mechanism defined in the

HTTP 1.1 [3] specification. Secure authentication is simply basic

authentication encapsulated in an SSLv3 [4] session.

In both cases, a UAP client needs to obtain the IP address and port

of the UAP service. Additional path information may be required,

depending on the implementation of the service. A URL [5] is an

excellent mechanism for encapsulation of this information since many

UAP servers will be implemented as components within legacy HTTP/SSL

servers.

Most UAP clients have no local state and are configured when booted

through DHCP. No existing DHCP option [6] has a data field that

contains a URL. Option 72 contains a list of IP addresses for WWW

servers, but it is not adequate since a port and/or path can not be

specified. Hence there is a need for an option that contains a list

of URLs.

User Authentication Protocol Option

This option specifies a list of URLs, each pointing to a user

authentication service that is capable of processing authentication

requests encapsulated in the User Authentication Protocol (UAP). UAP

servers can accept either HTTP 1.1 or SSLv3 connections. If the list

includes a URL that does not contain a port component, the normal

default port is assumed (i.e., ...