Dismiss
InnovationQ/InnovationQ Plus content will be updated on Sunday, June 25, 10am ET, with new patent and non-patent literature collections. Click here to learn more.
Browse Prior Art Database

Building Directories from DNS: Experiences from WWWSeeker (RFC2517)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000003101D
Original Publication Date: 1999-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Sep-13
Document File: 5 page(s) / 13K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

R. Moats: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

There has been much discussion and several documents written about the need for an Internet Directory. Recently, this discussion has focused on ways to discover an organization's domain name without relying on use of DNS as a directory service. This memo discusses lessons that were learned during InterNIC Directory and Database Services' development and operation of WWWSeeker, an application that finds a web site given information about the name and location of an organization. The back end database that drives this application was built from information obtained from domain registries via WHOIS and other protocols. We present this information to help future implementors avoid some of the blind alleys that we have already explored. This work builds on the Netfind system that was created by Mike Schwartz and his team at the University of Colorado at Boulder [1].

This text was extracted from a ASCII Text document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 23% of the total text.

Network Working Group R. Moats

Request for Comments: 2517 R. Huber

Category: Informational AT&T

February 1999

Building Directories from DNS: Experiences from WWWSeeker

Status of this Memo

This memo provides information for the Internet community. It does

not specify an Internet standard of any kind. Distribution of this

memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

Copyright (C) The Internet Society (1999). All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

There has been much discussion and several documents written about

the need for an Internet Directory. Recently, this discussion has

focused on ways to discover an organization's domain name without

relying on use of DNS as a directory service. This memo discusses

lessons that were learned during InterNIC Directory and Database

Services' development and operation of WWWSeeker, an application that

finds a web site given information about the name and location of an

organization. The back end database that drives this application was

built from information obtained from domain registries via WHOIS and

other protocols. We present this information to help future

implementors avoid some of the blind alleys that we have already

explored. This work builds on the Netfind system that was created by

Mike Schwartz and his team at the University of Colorado at Boulder

[1].

1. Introduction

Over time, there have been several RFCs [2, 3, 4] about approaches

for providing Internet Directories. Many of the earlier documents

discussed white pages directories that supply mappings from a

person's name to their telephone number, email address, etc.

More recently, there has been discussion of directories that map from

a company name to a domain name or web site. Many people are using

DNS as a directory today to find this type of information about a

given company. Typically when DNS is used, users guess the domain

name of the company they are looking for and then prepend "www.".

This makes it highly desirable for a company to have an easily

guessable name.

There are two major problems here. As the number of assigned names

increases, it becomes more difficult to get an easily guessable name.

Also, the TLD must be guessed as well as the name. While many users

just guess ".COM" as the "default" TLD today, there are many two-

letter country code top-level domains in current use as well as other

gTLDs (.NET, .ORG, and possibly .EDU) with the prospect of additional

gTLDs in the future. As the number of TLDs in general use increases,

guessing gets more difficult.

Between July 1996 and our shutdown in March 1998, the InterNIC

Directory and Database Services project maintained the Netfind search

engine [1] and the associated database that maps organization

information to domain names. This database ...