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DHCP Option to Disable Stateless Auto-Configuration in IPv4 Clients (RFC2563)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000003150D
Original Publication Date: 1999-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Sep-13
Document File: 7 page(s) / 16K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

R. Troll: AUTHOR

Abstract

Operating Systems are now attempting to support ad-hoc networks of two or more systems, while keeping user configuration at a minimum. To accommodate this, in the absence of a central configuration mechanism (DHCP), some OS's are automatically choosing a link-local IP address which will allow them to communicate only with other hosts on the same link. This address will not allow the OS to communicate with anything beyond a router. However, some sites depend on the fact that a host with no DHCP response will have no IP address. This document describes a mechanism by which DHCP servers are able to tell clients that they do not have an IP address to offer, and that the client should not generate an IP address it's own.

This text was extracted from a ASCII document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 17% of the total text.

Network Working Group R. Troll

Request for Comments: 2563 @Home Network

Category: Standards Track May 1999

DHCP Option to Disable Stateless Auto-Configuration in IPv4 Clients

Status of this Memo

This document specifies an Internet standards track protocol for the

Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for

improvements. Please refer to the current edition of the "Internet

Official Protocol Standards" (STD 1) for the standardization state

and status of this protocol. Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

Copyright (C) The Internet Society (1999). All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

Operating Systems are now attempting to support ad-hoc networks of

two or more systems, while keeping user configuration at a minimum.

To accommodate this, in the absence of a central configuration

mechanism (DHCP), some OS's are automatically choosing a link-local

IP address which will allow them to communicate only with other hosts

on the same link. This address will not allow the OS to communicate

with anything beyond a router. However, some sites depend on the

fact that a host with no DHCP response will have no IP address. This

document describes a mechanism by which DHCP servers are able to tell

clients that they do not have an IP address to offer, and that the

client should not generate an IP address it's own.

1. Introduction

With computers becoming a larger part of everyday life, operating

systems must be able to support a larger range of operating

environments. One aspect of this support is the selection of an IP

address. The Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol [DHCP] provides a

superb method by which site administrators may supply IP addresses

(and other network parameters) to network devices. However, some

operating environments are not centrally maintained, and operating

systems must now be able to handle this quickly and easily.

IPv6 accounts for this, and allows an IPv6 stack to assign itself a

global address in the absence of any other mechanism for

configuration [IPv6SAC]. However, Operating System designers can't

wait for IPv6 support everywhere. They need to be able to assume

they will have IPv4 addresses, so that they may communicate with one

another even in the smallest networks.

This document looks at three types of network nodes, and how IPv4

address auto-configuration may be disabled on a per-subnet (or even

per-node) basis. The three types of network nodes are:

* A node for which the site administrato...