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Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (v3): Extensions for Dynamic Directory Services (RFC2589)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000003176D
Original Publication Date: 1999-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Sep-13
Document File: 10 page(s) / 25K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

Y. Yaacovi: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This document defines the requirements for dynamic directory services and specifies the format of request and response extended operations for supporting client-server interoperation in a dynamic directories environment.

This text was extracted from a ASCII document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 11% of the total text.

Network Working Group Y. Yaacovi

Request for Comments: 2589 Microsoft

Category: Standards Track M. Wahl

Innosoft International, Inc.

T. Genovese

Microsoft

May 1999

Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (v3):

Extensions for Dynamic Directory Services

Status of this Memo

This document specifies an Internet standards track protocol for the

Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for

improvements. Please refer to the current edition of the "Internet

Official Protocol Standards" (STD 1) for the standardization state

and status of this protocol. Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

Copyright (C) The Internet Society (1999). All Rights Reserved.

1. Abstract

This document defines the requirements for dynamic directory services

and specifies the format of request and response extended operations

for supporting client-server interoperation in a dynamic directories

environment.

The Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) [1] supports

lightweight access to static directory services, allowing relatively

fast search and update access. Static directory services store

information about people that persists in its accuracy and value over

a long period of time.

Dynamic directory services are different in that they store

information that only persists in its accuracy and value when it is

being periodically refreshed. This information is stored as dynamic

entries in the directory. A typical use will be a client or a person

that is either online - in which case it has an entry in the

directory, or is offline - in which case its entry disappears from

the directory. Though the protocol operations and attributes used by

dynamic directory services are similar to the ones used for static

directory services, clients that store dynamic information in the

directory need to periodically refresh this information, in order to

prevent it from disappearing. If dynamic entries are not refreshed

within a given timeout, they will be removed from the directory. For

example, this will happen if the client that set them goes offline.

A flow control mechanism from the server is also described that

allows a server to inform clients how often they should refresh their

presence.

2. R...