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Key Management for Multicast: Issues and Architectures (RFC2627)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000003214D
Original Publication Date: 1999-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Sep-13
Document File: 19 page(s) / 55K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

D. Wallner: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This report contains a discussion of the difficult problem of key management for multicast communication sessions. It focuses on two main areas of concern with respect to key management, which are, initializing the multicast group with a common net key and rekeying the multicast group. A rekey may be necessary upon the compromise of a user or for other reasons (e.g., periodic rekey). In particular, this report identifies a technique which allows for secure compromise recovery, while also being robust against collusion of excluded users. This is one important feature of multicast key management which has not been addressed in detail by most other multicast key management proposals [1,2,4]. The benefits of this proposed technique are that it minimizes the number of transmissions required to rekey the multicast group and it imposes minimal storage requirements on the multicast group.

This text was extracted from a ASCII Text document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 5% of the total text.

Network Working Group D. Wallner

Request for Comments: 2627 E. Harder

Category: Informational R. Agee

National Security Agency

June 1999

Key Management for Multicast: Issues and Architectures

Status of this Memo

This memo provides information for the Internet community. It does

not specify an Internet standard of any kind. Distribution of this

memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

Copyright (C) The Internet Society (1999). All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

This report contains a discussion of the difficult problem of key

management for multicast communication sessions. It focuses on two

main areas of concern with respect to key management, which are,

initializing the multicast group with a common net key and rekeying

the multicast group. A rekey may be necessary upon the compromise of

a user or for other reasons (e.g., periodic rekey). In particular,

this report identifies a technique which allows for secure compromise

recovery, while also being robust against collusion of excluded

users. This is one important feature of multicast key management

which has not been addressed in detail by most other multicast key

management proposals [1,2,4]. The benefits of this proposed

technique are that it minimizes the number of transmissions required

to rekey the multicast group and it imposes minimal storage

requirements on the multicast group.

1.0 MOTIVATION

It is recognized that future networks will have requirements that

will strain the capabilities of current key management architectures.

One of these requirements will be the secure multicast requirement.

The need for high bandwidth, very dynamic secure multicast

communications is increasingly evident in a wide variety of

commercial, government, and Internet communities. Specifically, the

secure multicast requirement is the necessity for multiple users who

share the same security attributes and communication requirements to

securely communicate with every other member of the multicast group

using a common multicast group net key. The largest benefit of the

multicast communication being that multiple receivers simultaneously

get the same transmission. Thus the problem is enabling each user to

determine/obtain the same net key without permitting unauthorized

parties to do likewise (initializing the multicast group) and

securely rekeying the users of the multicast group when necessary.

At first glance, this may not appear to be any different than current

key management scenarios. This paper will show, however, that future

multicast scenarios will have very divergent and dynamically changing

requirements which will make it very challenging from a key

management perspective to address.

2.0 INTRODUCTION

The netwo...