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Internationalization of the File Transfer Protocol (RFC2640)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000003228D
Original Publication Date: 1999-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Sep-13
Document File: 21 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

B. Curtin: AUTHOR

Abstract

The File Transfer Protocol, as defined in RFC 959 [RFC959] and RFC 1123 Section 4 [RFC1123], is one of the oldest and widely used protocols on the Internet. The protocol's primary character set, 7 bit ASCII, has served the protocol well through the early growth years of the Internet. However, as the Internet becomes more global, there is a need to support character sets beyond 7 bit ASCII.

This text was extracted from a ASCII document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 5% of the total text.

Network Working Group B. Curtin

Request for Comments: 2640 Defense Information Systems Agency

Updates: 959 July 1999

Category: Proposed Standard

Internationalization of the File Transfer Protocol

Status of this Memo

This document specifies an Internet standards track protocol for the

Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for

improvements. Please refer to the current edition of the "Internet

Official Protocol Standards" (STD 1) for the standardization state

and status of this protocol. Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

Copyright (C) The Internet Society (1999). All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

The File Transfer Protocol, as defined in RFC 959 [RFC959] and RFC

1123 Section 4 [RFC1123], is one of the oldest and widely used

protocols on the Internet. The protocol's primary character set, 7

bit ASCII, has served the protocol well through the early growth

years of the Internet. However, as the Internet becomes more global,

there is a need to support character sets beyond 7 bit ASCII.

This document addresses the internationalization (I18n) of FTP, which

includes supporting the multiple character sets and languages found

throughout the Internet community. This is achieved by extending the

FTP specification and giving recommendations for proper

internationalization support.

Table of Contents

ABSTRACT.......................................................1

1 INTRODUCTION.................................................2

1.1 Requirements Terminology..................................2

2 INTERNATIONALIZATION.........................................3

2.1 International Character Set...............................3

2.2 Transfer Encoding Set.....................................4

3 PATHNAMES....................................................5

3.1 General compliance........................................5

3.2 Servers compliance........................................6

3.3 Clients compliance........................................7

4 LANGUAGE SUPPORT.............................................7

4.1 The LANG command..........................................8

4.2 Syntax of the LANG command................................9

4.3 Feat response for LANG command...........................11

4.3.1 Feat examples.........................................11

5 SECURITY CONSIDERATIONS.....................................12

6 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.............................................12

7 GLOSSARY......................