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Using RPSL in Practice (RFC2650)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000003239D
Original Publication Date: 1999-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Sep-13
Document File: 21 page(s) / 51K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

D. Meyer: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

This document is a tutorial on using the Routing Policy Specification Language (RPSL) to describe routing policies in the Internet Routing Registry (IRR). We explain how to specify various routing policies and configurations using RPSL, how to register these policies in the IRR, and how to analyze them using the routing policy analysis tools, for example to generate vendor specific router configurations.

This text was extracted from a ASCII document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 5% of the total text.

Network Working Group D. Meyer

Request for Comments: 2650 Cisco Systems

Category: Informational J. Schmitz

America On-Line

C. Orange

RIPE NCC

M. Prior

Connect

C. Alaettinoglu

USC/ISI

August 1999

Using RPSL in Practice

Status of this Memo

This memo provides information for the Internet community. It does

not specify an Internet standard of any kind. Distribution of this

memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

Copyright (C) The Internet Society (1999). All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

This document is a tutorial on using the Routing Policy Specification

Language (RPSL) to describe routing policies in the Internet Routing

Registry (IRR). We explain how to specify various routing policies

and configurations using RPSL, how to register these policies in the

IRR, and how to analyze them using the routing policy analysis tools,

for example to generate vendor specific router configurations.

1 Introduction

This document is a tutorial on RPSL and is targeted towards an

Internet/Network Service Provider (ISP/NSP) engineer who understands

Internet routing, but is new to RPSL and to the IRR. Readers are

referred to the RPSL reference document (RFC 2622) [1] for

completeness. It is also good to have that document at hand while

working through this tutorial.

The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",

"SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this

document are to be interpreted as described in RFC 2119.

The IRR is a repository of routing policies. Currently, the IRR

repository is a set of five repositories maintained at the following

sites: the CA*Net registry in Canada, the ANS, CW and RADB

registries in the United States of America, and the RIPE registry in

Europe. The five repositories are run independently. However, each

site exchanges its data with the others regularly (at least once a

day and as often as every ten minutes). CW, CA*Net and ANS are

private registries which contain the routing policies of the networks

...