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Nortel Networks Multi-link Multi-node PPP Bundle Discovery Protocol (RFC2701)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000003295D
Original Publication Date: 1999-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Sep-13
Document File: 7 page(s) / 16K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

G. Malkin: AUTHOR

Abstract

This document specifies a standard way for Multi-link PPP to operate across multiple nodes. Both the mechanism by which the Bundle Head is discovered and the PPP fragment encapsulation are specified.

This text was extracted from a ASCII document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 17% of the total text.

Network Working Group G. Malkin

Request for Comments: 2701 Nortel Networks

Category: Informational September 1999

Nortel Networks

Multi-link Multi-node PPP Bundle Discovery Protocol

Status of this Memo

This memo provides information for the Internet community. It does

not specify an Internet standard of any kind. Distribution of this

memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

Copyright (C) The Internet Society (1999). All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

This document specifies a standard way for Multi-link PPP to operate

across multiple nodes. Both the mechanism by which the Bundle Head

is discovered and the PPP fragment encapsulation are specified.

Acknowledgements

I would like to thank Joe Frazier for filling in some of the details

and reviewing this document.

1. Introduction

Multi-link PPP [MP] allows a dial-in user to open multiple PPP

connections to a given host. In general, this is done on an on-

demand basis. That is, a secondary link, or multiple secondary

links, are established when the data load on the primary link, and

any previously established secondary links, nears capacity. As the

load decreases, the secondary link(s) may be disconnected.

Many dial-in hosts which support multi-link PPP dial the same phone

number for all links. This implies that there exists a rotary at the

Point Of Presence (POP) which routes incoming calls to a bank of

modems. These may be physically independent modems connected to

Remote Access Server (RAS) and a rotary of analog phone lines, or a

RAS with internal modems connected to analog lines or a T1/E1 or

T3/E3 channel. In any case, a given RAS can only handle just so many

simultaneous connections. A typical POP may need to support hundreds

of connections, but no RAS today can handle that many. This creates

a problem when a user's primary PPP connection is established to one

RAS in a POP and a secondary connection is established to another.

This may occur because the first RAS has no available modems, or

because incoming calls are assigned to ports in a round-robin

fashion, for example, and the second call is simply assigned to

another RAS.

The solution to this problem is to provide a mechanism by which a RAS

can determine if a Multi-link PPP connection is a primary or

secondary and, if a secondary, where the Bundle Head (the process

within a RAS which reassembles the PPP fragments transmitted over the

primary and secondary links) resides. If the Bundle Head resides o...