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A Framework for Policy-based Admission Control (RFC2753)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000003350D
Original Publication Date: 2000-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-May-22
Document File: 21 page(s) / 50K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

R. Yavatkar: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The IETF working groups such as Integrated Services (called "int- serv") and RSVP [1] have developed extensions to the IP architecture and the best-effort service model so that applications or end users can request specific quality (or levels) of service from an internetwork in addition to the current IP best-effort service. Recent efforts in the Differentiated Services Working Group are also directed at the definition of mechanisms that support aggregate QoS services. The int-serv model for these new services requires explicit signaling of the QoS (Quality of Service) requirements from the end points and provision of admission and traffic control at Integrated Services routers. The proposed standards for RSVP [RFC 2205] and Integrated Services [RFC 2211, RFC 2212] are examples of a new reservation setup protocol and new service definitions respectively. Under the int-serv model, certain data flows receive preferential treatment over other flows; the admission control component only takes into account the requester's resource reservation request and available capacity to determine whether or not to accept a QoS request. However, the int-serv mechanisms do not include an important aspect of admission control: network managers and service providers must be able to monitor, control, and enforce use of network resources and services based on policies derived from criteria such as the identity of users and applications, traffic/bandwidth requirements, security considerations, and time-

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 6% of the total text.

Network Working Group                                         R. Yavatkar
Request for Comments: 2753                                          Intel
Category: Informational                                     D. Pendarakis
                                                                      IBM
                                                                R. Guerin
                                                       U. Of Pennsylvania
                                                             January 2000


             A Framework for Policy-based Admission Control


Status of this Memo

   This memo provides information for the Internet community.  It does
   not specify an Internet standard of any kind.  Distribution of this
   memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2000).  All Rights Reserved.

1. Introduction

   The IETF working groups such as Integrated Services (called "int-
   serv") and RSVP [1] have developed extensions to the IP architecture
   and the best-effort service model so that applications or end users
   can request specific quality (or levels) of service from an
   internetwork in addition to the current IP best-effort service.
   Recent efforts in the Differentiated Services Working Group are also
   directed at the definition of mechanisms that support aggregate QoS
   services. The int-serv model for these new services requires explicit
   signaling of the QoS (Quality of Service) requirements from the end
   points and provision of admission and traffic control at Integrated
   Services routers. The proposed standards for RSVP [RFC 2205] and
   Integrated Services [RFC 2211, RFC 2212] are examples of a new
   reservation setup protocol and new service definitions respectively.
   Under the int-serv model, certain data flows receive preferential
   treatment over other flows; the admission control component only
   takes into account the requester's resource reservation request and
   available capacity to determine whether or not to accept a QoS
   request.  However, the int-serv mechanisms do not include an
   important aspect of admission control: network managers and service
   providers must be able to monitor, control, and enforce use of
   network resources and services based on policies derived from
   criteria such as the identity of users and applications,
   traffic/bandwidth requirements, security considerations, and time-


Yavatkar, et al.             Informational                      [Page 1]
RFC 2753     ...