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GLOP Addressing in 233/8 (RFC2770)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000003368D
Original Publication Date: 2000-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Sep-13
Document File: 4 page(s) / 8K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

D. Meyer: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This describes an experimental policy for use of the class D address space using 233/8 as the experimental statically assigned subset of the class D address space. This new experimental allocation is in addition to those described on [IANA] (e.g. [RFC2365]).

This text was extracted from a ASCII Text document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 36% of the total text.

Network Working Group D. Meyer

Request for Comments: 2770 Cisco Systems

Category: Experimental P. Lothberg

Sprint

February 2000

GLOP Addressing in 233/8

Status of this Memo

This memo defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet

community. It does not specify an Internet standard of any kind.

Discussion and suggestions for improvement are requested.

Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2000). All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

This describes an experimental policy for use of the class D address

space using 233/8 as the experimental statically assigned subset of

the class D address space. This new experimental allocation is in

addition to those described on [IANA] (e.g. [RFC2365]).

This memo is a product of the Multicast Deployment Working Group

(MBONED) in the Operations and Management Area of the Internet

Engineering Task Force. Submit comments to or

the authors.

1. Problem Statement

Multicast addresses have traditionally been allocated by a dynamic

mechanism such as SDR [SAP]. However, many current multicast

deployment models are not amenable to dynamic allocation. For

example, many content aggregators require group addresses which are

fixed on a time scale which is not amenable to allocation by a

mechanism such as described in [SAP]. Perhaps more seriously, since

there isn't general consensus by providers, content aggregators, or

application writers as to the allocation mechanism, the Internet is

left without a coherent multicast address allocation scheme.

The MALLOC working group is looking at a specific strategy for global

multicast address allocation [MADCAP, MASC]. This experiment will

proceed in parallel. MADCAP may be employed within AS's, if so

desired.

This document proposes an experimental method of statically

allocating multicast addresses with global scope. This experiment

will last for a period of one year, but may be extended as described

in section 6.

2. Address Space

For purposes of the experiment described here, the IANA has allocated

233/8. The remaining 24 bits will be administered in a manner similar

to that described in RFC 1797:

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1

+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

| 233 | 16 bits AS | local bits |

+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

2.1. Example

Consider, for example, AS 5662. Written in binary, left padded with

0s, we get 0001011000011110. Mapping the high order octet to the

second octet of the address, and the low order octet to the third

octet, we get 233.22....