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DHCP for IEEE 1394 (RFC2855)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000003454D
Original Publication Date: 2000-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Sep-13
Document File: 4 page(s) / 7K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

K. Fujisawa: AUTHOR

Abstract

IEEE Std 1394-1995 is a standard for a High Performance Serial Bus. Since 1394 uses a different link-layer addressing method than conventional IEEE802/Ethernet, the usage of some fields must be clarified to achieve interoperability. This memo describes the 1394 specific usage of some fields of DHCP messages.

This text was extracted from a ASCII document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 37% of the total text.

Network Working Group K. Fujisawa

Request for Comments: 2855 Sony Corporation

Category: Standards Track June 2000

DHCP for IEEE 1394

Status of this Memo

This document specifies an Internet standards track protocol for the

Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for

improvements. Please refer to the current edition of the "Internet

Official Protocol Standards" (STD 1) for the standardization state

and status of this protocol. Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2000). All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

IEEE Std 1394-1995 is a standard for a High Performance Serial Bus.

Since 1394 uses a different link-layer addressing method than

conventional IEEE802/Ethernet, the usage of some fields must be

clarified to achieve interoperability. This memo describes the 1394

specific usage of some fields of DHCP messages.

1. Introduction

IEEE Std 1394-1995 is a standard for a High Performance Serial Bus.

IETF IP1394 Working Group specified the method to carry IPv4

datagrams and 1394 ARP packets over an IEEE1394 network [RFC2734].

The Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) [RFC2131] provides a

framework for passing configuration information to hosts on a TCP/IP

network.

Since 1394 uses a different link-layer addressing method than

conventional IEEE802/Ethernet, the usage of some fields must be

clarified to achieve interoperability. This memo describes the 1394

specific usage of some fields of DHCP. See [RFC2131] for the

mechanism of DHCP and the explanations of each field.

The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",

"SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this

document are to be interpreted as described in RFC 2119 [RFC2119].

2. Issues related to 1394 link address

With conventional link-layer protocols, such as an Ethernet, the

'chaddr' (client hardware address) field may be used to return a

reply message from a DHCP server (or relay-agent) to a client. Since

a 1394 link address (node_ID) is transient and will not be consistent

across the 1394 bridge, we have chosen not to put it in the 'chaddr'

field. A DHCP client should request that the server sends a

broadcast reply by setting the BROADCAST flag when 1394 ARP is not

possible yet.

Note: In general, the use of a broadcast reply is discouraged, but

we consider the impact in a 1394 network as a non issue.

3. 1394 specific usage of DHCP message fie...