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Multi-site data collection facility (RFC0672)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000003724D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Dec-06
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Sep-13
Document File: 9 page(s) / 26K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

R. Schantz: AUTHOR

Abstract

The development of computer networks has provided the groundwork for distributed computation: one in which a job or task is comprised of components from various computer systems. In a single computer system, the unavailability or malfunction of any of the job components (e.g. program, file, device, etc.) usually necessitates job termination. With computer networks, it becomes feasible to duplicate certain job components which previously had no basis for duplication. (In a single system, it does not matter how many times a process that performs a certain function is duplicated; a system crash makes all unavailable). It is such resource duplication that enables us to utilize the network to achieve high reliability and load leveling. In order to realize the potential of resource duplication, it is necessary to have protocols which provide for the orderly use of these resources. In this document, we first discuss in general terms a problem of protocol definition for interacting with a multiply defined resource (server). The problem deals with providing a highly reliable data collection facility, by supporting it at many sites throughout the network. In the second section of this document, we describe in detail a particular implementation of the protocol which handles the problem of utilizing multiple data collector processes for collecting accounting data generated by the network TIPs. This example also illustrates the specialization of hosts to perform parts of a computation they are best equipped to handle. The large network hosts (TENEX systems) perform the accounting function for the small network access TiPs.

This text was extracted from a ASCII document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 11% of the total text.

Network Working Group Richard Schantz (BBN-TENEX)

Request for Comments: 672 Dec 1974

NIC #31440

A Multi-Site Data Collection Facility

Preface:

This RFC reproduces most of a working document

prepared during the design and implementation of the

protocols for the TIP-TENEX integrated system for

handling TIP accounting. Bernie Cosell (BBN-TIP)

and Bob Thomas (BBN-TENEX) have contributed to

various aspects of this work. The system has been

partially operational for about a month on selected

hosts. We feel that the techniques described here

have wide applicability beyond TIP accounting.

Section I

Protocols for a Multi-site Data Collection Facility

Introduction

The development of computer networks has provided the

groundwork for distributed computation: one in which a job or task

is comprised of components from various computer systems. In a

single computer system, the unavailability or malfunction of any of

the job components (e.g. program, file, device, etc.) usually

necessitates job termination. With computer networks, it becomes

feasible to duplicate certain job components which previously had no

basis for duplication. (In a single system, it does not matter how

many times a process that performs a certain function is duplicated;

a system crash makes all unavailable). It is such resource

duplication that enables us to utilize the network to achieve high

reliability and load leveling. In order to realize the potential of

resource duplication, it is necessary to have protocols which

provide for the orderly use of these resources. In this document,

we first discuss in general terms a problem of protocol definition

for interacting with a multiply defined resource (server). The

problem deals with providing a highly reliable data collection

facility, by supporting it at many sites throughout the network. In

the second section of this document, we describe in detail a

particular implementation of the protocol which handles the problem

of utilizing multiple data collector processes for collecting

accounting data generated by the network TIPs. This example also

illustrates the specialization of hosts to perform parts of a

computation they are best equipped to handle. The large network

hosts (TENEX systems) perform the accounting function for the small

network access TiPs.

The situation to be discussed is the following: a data

generating process needs to use a data collection service which is

duplicately provided by processes on a number of network machines.

A reques...