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Elements of a Distributed Programming System (RFC0708)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000003754D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Jan-28
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Sep-13
Document File: 22 page(s) / 57K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

J.E. White: AUTHOR

Abstract

In a companion paper [i], the author proposes a simple protocol and software framework that would facilitate the construction of distributed systems within a resource-sharing computer network by enabling distant processes to communicate with one another at the procedure call level. Although of great utility even in its present form, this rudimentary "distributed programming system (DPS)" supports only the most fundamental aspects of remote procedure calling. In particular, it permits the caller to identify the remote procedure to be called, supply the necessary arguments, determine the outcome of the procedure, and recover its results. The present paper extends this simple procedure call model and standardizes other common forms of process interaction to provide a more powerful and comprehensive distributed programming system. The particular extensions proposed in this paper serve hopefully to reveal the DPS concept's potential, and are offered not as dogma but rather as stimulus for further research.

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Network Working Group James E. White

Request for Comments: 708 Augmentation Research Center

Elements of a Distributed Programming System

January 5, 1976

James E. White

Augmentation Research Center

Stanford Research Institute

Menlo Park, California 94025

(415) 326-6200 X2960

This paper suggests some extensions to the simple Procedure Call Protocol

described in a previous paper (27197). By expanding the procedure call

model and standardizing other common forms of inter-process interaction,

such extensions would provide the applications programmer with an even

more powerful distributed programming system.

The work reported here was supported by the Advanced Research Projects

Agency of the Department of Defense, and by the Rome Air Development

Center of the Air Force.

This paper will be submitted to publication in the Journal of Computer

Languages.

Network Working Group James E. White

Request for Comments: 708 Elements of a Distributed Programming System

INTRODUCTION

In a companion paper [i], the author proposes a simple protocol and

software framework that would facilitate the construction of distributed

systems within a resource-sharing computer network by enabling distant

processes to communicate with one another at the procedure call level.

Although of great utility even in its present form, this rudimentary

"distributed programming system (DPS)" supports only the most fundamental

aspects of remote procedure calling. In particular, it permits the

caller to identify the remote procedure to be called, supply the

necessary arguments, determine the outcome of the procedure, and recover

its results. The present paper extends this simple procedure call model

and standardizes other common forms of process interaction to provide

a more powerful and comprehensive distributed programming system. The

particular extensions proposed in this paper serve hopefully to reveal the

DPS concept's potential, and are offered not as dogma but rather as

stimulus for further research.

The first section of this paper summarizes the basic distributed

programming system derived in [1]. The second section describes the

general strategy to be followed in extending it. The third and longest

section identifies and explores some of the aspects of process interaction

that are sufficiently common to warrant standardization, and suggests

methods for incorporating them in the DPS model.

REVIEWING THE BASIC SYSTEM

The distributed programming system derived in [1] a...