Browse Prior Art Database

Ways to Define User Expectations (RFC1746)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000003996D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Sep-12
Document File: 15 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

B. Manning: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This paper covers basic fundamentals that must be understood when one defines, interprets, or implements methods to control user expectations on or over the Internet.

This text was extracted from a ASCII document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 6% of the total text.

Network Working Group B. Manning

Request for Comments: 1746 ISI

Category: Informational D. Perkins

Houston ISD

December 1994

Ways to Define User Expectations

Status of this Memo

This memo provides information for the Internet community. This memo

does not specify an Internet standard of any kind. Distribution of

this memo is unlimited.

Abstract

This paper covers basic fundamentals that must be understood when one

defines, interprets, or implements methods to control user

expectations on or over the Internet.

1. Background

User agreements are a form of acceptable use policy (AUP) are an

implicit part of internetworking since they place parameters on user

expectation. They define the desired and expected behaviour of those

who participate. Everyone has one, whether published or not. This

applies to networks that provide transit paths for other networks as

well as end sites and the individual users that use systems. A

better understanding of an AUP, and how to formulate one seems to be

increasingly important as the global net encompases new environments

as varied as K12 schools and real-time systems. AUP's are used to

determine pricing, customer base, type and quality of service

metrics, and a host of other provider services.

2. Components of an Agreement

In defining your particular agreement there are three areas that must

be addressed. They are where you get service from, who your peers

are, and whom you provide service to. A good understanding of these

concepts will make or break the policies you formulate.

2.1 Where you get service from

Each entity gets its service from one or more other providers,

either a level three service, such as IP transit, or a level two

service, such as circuits. The provider of such services usually has

an policy in the form of an agreement or contract specifying terms

and conditions of use. This forms the basis for the type of service

offerings that you as an entity can provide. If you get service from

several providers, all of them need to be considered in the

formation of policy.

2.2 Who your peers are

Are your policies consistent with those offered by your peers? In

many cases, the formation of policy will define who your peers are.

It is important to clearly identify which areas you intend to reach

and the community you wish to be a contributing, pr...