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Remote Write Protocol - Version 1.0 (RFC1756)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000004006D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Sep-12
Document File: 10 page(s) / 20K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

T. Rinne: AUTHOR

Abstract

It is often convenient to use electronic communication somewhat lighter than electronic mail. Sometimes even the use of the talk(1) *) program seems like overkill. We like to offer to user something like UNIX **) command write(1) ***) except that it can also pass messages through the network instead of the single host.

This text was extracted from a ASCII Text document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 14% of the total text.

Network Working Group T. Rinne

Request for Comments: 1756 HUT

Category: Experimental January 1995

REMOTE WRITE PROTOCOL - VERSION 1.0

Status of this Memo

This memo defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet

community. This memo does not specify an Internet standard of any

kind. Discussion and suggestions for improvement are requested.

Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

1. Background

It is often convenient to use electronic communication somewhat

lighter than electronic mail. Sometimes even the use of the talk(1)

*) program seems like overkill. We like to offer to user something

like UNIX **) command write(1) ***) except that it can also pass

messages through the network instead of the single host.

There have been few programs offering this kind of service, but they

have either based on SUN-RPC protocol or used a strictly undocumented

protocol.

This document describes a simple Remote Write Protocol (RWP) that

should have been documented at least 10 years ago. But late is

better than never. Version number of the RWP protocol in this

document is 1.0.

2. Overview

RWP is a simple protocol that can be used to relay short messages

through the network to other users. RWP looks pretty much like

Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) ****) though it is a bit more

complicated due to the interactive nature of the RWP session.

The idea behind the RWP session is that client program that is

relaying message to the host in which the target user is logged in

opens the tcp or udp connection to the server program running in the

target machine Then the client gives the sender's and recipient's

identification (usually login ids), actual message body and tells the

server to deliver a message to the user. On tcp-connection server

returns a status from each action taken. On udp-connection no

responses are sent. RWP sessions through udp are implemented to

support message broadcasting.

Message delivering methods are not defined within this document, but

the basic method could be a simple write to users terminal. This is

basically what UNIX command write(1) does. Depending on server

implementation, the delivery method could be configurable personally

by each user.

3. Description

Server program answers to each command submitted by a response. All

responses have two parts: three number unique response code and a

short textual explanation of the response. Also whenever the server

is ready to accept new commands a notification is submitted to the

client.

There are three kinds of commands in RWP. The first group is for

querying a status of the server. The second group is actual message

handling commands and the last set of commands are for RWP session

control.

When the server is ready to receive a command from the client, it

sends a mes...