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OSPF Database Overflow (RFC1765)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000004016D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Sep-12
Document File: 8 page(s) / 20K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

J. Moy: AUTHOR

Abstract

Proper operation of the OSPF protocol requires that all OSPF routers maintain an identical copy of the OSPF link-state database. However, when the size of the link-state database becomes very large, some routers may be unable to keep the entire database due to resource shortages; we term this "database overflow". When database overflow is anticipated, the routers with limited resources can be accommodated by configuring OSPF stub areas and NSSAs. This memo details a way of gracefully handling unanticipated database overflows.

This text was extracted from a ASCII Text document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 15% of the total text.

Network Working Group J. Moy

Request for Comments: 1765 Cascade

Category: Experimental March 1995

OSPF Database Overflow

Status of this Memo

This memo defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet

community. This memo does not specify an Internet standard of any

kind. Discussion and suggestions for improvement are requested.

Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Abstract

Proper operation of the OSPF protocol requires that all OSPF routers

maintain an identical copy of the OSPF link-state database. However,

when the size of the link-state database becomes very large, some

routers may be unable to keep the entire database due to resource

shortages; we term this "database overflow". When database overflow

is anticipated, the routers with limited resources can be

accommodated by configuring OSPF stub areas and NSSAs. This memo

details a way of gracefully handling unanticipated database

overflows.

This memo is a product of the OSPF Working Group. Please send

comments to ospf@gated.cornell.edu.

Table of Contents

1. Overview ............................................... 2

2. Implementation details ................................. 3

2.1 Configuration .......................................... 3

2.2 Entering OverflowState ................................. 4

2.3 Operation while in OverflowState ....................... 5

2.3.1 Modifications to Flooding .............................. 5

2.3.2 Originating AS-external-LSAs ........................... 6

2.3.3 Receiving self-originated LSAs ......................... 6

2.4 Leaving OverflowState .................................. 6

3. An example ............................................. 6

4. Administrative response to database overflow ........... 7

5. Operational experience ................................. 8

6. Possible enhancements .................................. 8

A. Related MIB parameters ................................ 8

References ............................................ 9

Security Considerations ............................... 9

Author's Address ...................................... 9

1. Overview

OSPF requires that all OSPF routers within a single area maintain an

identical copy of the OSPF link-state database. However, when the

size of the link-state database becomes very large, some routers may

be unable to keep the entire database due to resource shortages; we

term this "database overflow". For example, a regional network may

have a very large OSPF database because it is importing a large

number of external routes into OSPF. Unless database overflow is

handled correctly, routers will end up with inconsistent views of the

network, possibly leading to incorrect r...