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Introducing Project Long Bud: Internet Pilot Project for the Deployment of X.500 Directory Information in Support of X.400 Routing (RFC1802)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000004058D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Sep-13
Document File: 14 page(s) / 23K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

H. Alvestrand: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

The Internet X.400 community (i.e., GO-MHS) currently lacks a distributed mechanism providing dynamic updating and management of message routing information. The IETF MHS-DS Working Group has specified an approach for X.400 Message Handling Systems to perform message routing using OSI Directory Services. The MHS-DS approach has been successfully tested in a number of local environments.

This text was extracted from a ASCII document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 12% of the total text.

Network Working Group H. Alvestrand

Request for Comments: 1802 UNINETT

Category: Informational K. Jordan

Control Data Systems

S. Langlois

Electricite de France

J. Romaguera

NetConsult

June 1995

Introducing Project Long Bud:

Internet Pilot Project for the Deployment of X.500 Directory

Information in Support of X.400 Routing

Status of this Memo

This memo provides information for the Internet community. This memo

does not specify an Internet standard of any kind. Distribution of

this memo is unlimited.

Abstract

The Internet X.400 community (i.e., GO-MHS) currently lacks a

distributed mechanism providing dynamic updating and management of

message routing information. The IETF MHS-DS Working Group has

specified an approach for X.400 Message Handling Systems to perform

message routing using OSI Directory Services. The MHS-DS approach

has been successfully tested in a number of local environments.

This memo describes a proposed Internet Pilot Project that seeks to

prove the MHS-DS approach on a larger scale. The results of this

pilot will then be used to draw up recommendations for a global

deployment.

1. Background

The 1988 edition of X.400 introduces, among other extensions or

revisions, the concept of O/R Names which assumes the existence of a

widely available Directory Service. This Directory Service is needed

to support several MHS operations (support for names to identify

senders and receivers of messages in a user-friendly fashion, support

for distribution lists, authentication of MHS components, description

of MHS components capabilities...).

The prime advantage of Directory Names, as perceived by many users,

was to release users from the remembering of complex O/R Addresses

for their correspondents.

In the MHS infrastructure, as compared to other protocols, a name by

itself does not contain enough information to allow the Message

Transfer Agents (MTAs) to route a message to the User Agent (UA)

servicing this name. The routing process is based on information

provided by different MHS Management Domains, whether they are public

or private.

An MHS community ...