Browse Prior Art Database

Reliable Asynchronous Transfer Protocol (RATP) (RFC0916)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000004327D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Oct-06

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

G.G. Finn: AUTHOR

Abstract

We are witnessing today an explosive growth in the small or personal computer market. Such inexpensive computers are not normally connected to a computer network. They are most likely stand-alone devices. But virtually all of them have an RS-232 interface. They also usually have a modem. This allows them to communicate over the telephone with any other similarly equipped computer.

This text was extracted from a ASCII Text document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 3% of the total text.

Network Working Group G. Finn

Request for Comments: 916 ISI

October 1984

RELIABLE ASYNCHRONOUS TRANSFER PROTOCOL (RATP)

Status of This Memo

This RFC suggests a proposed protocol for the ARPA-Internet

community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements.

Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

This paper proposes and specifies a protocol which allows two

programs to reliably communicate over a communication link. It

ensures that the data entering one end of the link if received

arrives at the other end intact and unaltered. The protocol, named

RATP, is designed to operate over a full duplex point-to-point

connection. It contains some features which tailor it to the RS-232

links now in common use.

Introduction

We are witnessing today an explosive growth in the small or personal

computer market. Such inexpensive computers are not normally

connected to a computer network. They are most likely stand-alone

devices. But virtually all of them have an RS-232 interface. They

also usually have a modem. This allows them to communicate over the

telephone with any other similarly equipped computer.

The telephone system is a pervasive network, but one of the

characteristics of the telephone system is the unpredictable quality

of the circuit. The standard telephone circuit is designed for voice

communication and not data communication. Voice communication

tolerates a much higher degree of 'noise' than does a data circuit,

so a voice circuit is tolerant of a much higher level of noise than

is a data circuit. Thus it is not uncommon for a byte of data

transferred over a telephone circuit to have noise inserted. For the

same reason it is also not uncommon to have spurious data bytes added

to the data stream.

The need for a method of reliably transferring data over an RS-232

point-to-point link has become severe. As the number of powerful

personal computers grows, the need for them to communicate with one

another grows as well. The new markets and new services that these

computers will eventually allow their users to access will rely

heavily upon the telephone system. Services like electronic mail,

electronic banking, ordering merchandise from home with a personal

computer, etc. As the information revolution proceeds data itself

will become a commodity. All require accuracy of the data sent or

received.

RFC 916 October 1984

Reliable Asynchronous Transfer Protocol

1. Philosopy of Design

Many tradeoffs were made in designing this protocol. Decisions were

made by above all ensuring reliability and then by favoring

simplicity of implementation. It is hoped that this protocol is

simple enough to be implemented not only by small computers but also

by stand al...