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Domain requirements (RFC0920)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000004331D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Oct-06
Document File: 13 page(s) / 27K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

J. Postel: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This memo restates and refines the requirements on establishing a Domain first described in RFC-881 [1]. It adds considerable detail to that discussion, and introduces the limited set of top level domains.

This text was extracted from a ASCII document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 10% of the total text.

Network Working Group J. Postel

Request for Comments: 920 J. Reynolds

ISI

October 1984

Domain Requirements

Status of this Memo

This memo is a policy statement on the requirements of establishing a

new domain in the ARPA-Internet and the DARPA research community.

This is an official policy statement of the IAB and the DARPA.

Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Introduction

This memo restates and refines the requirements on establishing a

Domain first described in RFC-881 [1]. It adds considerable detail

to that discussion, and introduces the limited set of top level

domains.

The Purpose of Domains

Domains are administrative entities. The purpose and expected use of

domains is to divide the name management required of a central

administration and assign it to sub-administrations. There are no

geographical, topological, or technological constraints on a domain.

The hosts in a domain need not have common hardware or software, nor

even common protocols. Most of the requirements and limitations on

domains are designed to ensure responsible administration.

The domain system is a tree-structured global name space that has a

few top level domains. The top level domains are subdivided into

second level domains. The second level domains may be subdivided

into third level domains, and so on.

The administration of a domain requires controlling the assignment of

names within that domain and providing access to the names and name

related information (such as addresses) to users both inside and

outside the domain.

RFC 920 October 1984

Domain Requirements

General Purpose Domains

While the initial domain name "ARPA" arises from the history of the

development of this system and environment, in the future most of the

top level names will be very general categories like "government",

"education", or "commercial". The motivation is to provide an

organization name that is free of undesirable semantics.

After a short period of initial experimentation, all current

ARPA-Internet hosts will select some domain other than ARPA for their

future use. The use of ARPA as a top level domain will eventually

cease.

Initial Set of Top Level Domains

The initial top level domain names are:

Temporary

ARPA = The current ARPA-Internet hosts.

Categories

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