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Post Office Protocol: Version 2 (RFC0937)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000004353D
Original Publication Date: 1985-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2000-Oct-11
Document File: 18 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

M. Butler: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

The intent of the Post Office Protocol Version 2 (POP2) is to allow a user's workstation to access mail from a mailbox server. It is expected that mail will be posted from the workstation to the mailbox server via the Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP). For further information see RFC-821 [1] and RFC-822 [2].

This text was extracted from a ASCII document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 7% of the total text.

Network Working Group M. Butler

Request for Comments: 937 J. Postel

D. Chase

J. Goldberger

J. K. Reynolds

Obsoletes: RFC 918 ISI

February 1985

POST OFFICE PROTOCOL - VERSION 2

Status of this Memo

This RFC suggests a simple method for workstations to dynamically

access mail from a mailbox server. This RFC specifies a proposed

protocol for the ARPA-Internet community, and requests discussion and

suggestions for improvement. This memo is a revision of RFC 918.

Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Introduction

The intent of the Post Office Protocol Version 2 (POP2) is to allow a

user's workstation to access mail from a mailbox server. It is

expected that mail will be posted from the workstation to the mailbox

server via the Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP). For further

information see RFC-821 [1] and RFC-822 [2].

This protocol assumes a reliable data stream such as provided by TCP

or any similar protocol. When TCP is used, the POP2 server listens

on port 109 [4].

System Model and Philosophy

While we view the workstation as an Internet host in the sense that

it implements IP, we do not expect the workstation to contain the

user's mailbox. We expect the mailbox to be on a server machine.

We believe it is important for the mailbox to be on an "always up"

machine and that a workstation may be frequently powered down, or

otherwise unavailable as an SMTP server.

POP2 is designed for an environment of workstations and servers on a

low-delay, high-throughput, local networks (such as Ethernets). POP2

may be useful in other environments as well, but if the environment

is substantially different, a different division of labor between the

client and server may be appropriate, and a different protocol

required.

Suppose the user's real name is John Smith, the user's machine is

called FIDO, and that the mailbox server is called DOG-HOUSE. Then

RFC 937 February 1985

Post Office Protocol

we expect the user's mail to be addressed to JSmith@DOG-HOUSE.ARPA

(not JSmith@FIDO.ARPA).

That is, the destination of the mail is the mailbox on the server

machine. The POP2 protocol and the workstation are merely a

mechanism for viewing the me...