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Method of Disinfecting a Telephone Handset

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000004373D
Publication Date: 2000-Oct-18
Document File: 3 page(s) / 337K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

The present invention is a set of pads installed on the body of the telephone that contain disinfectant, which is supplied by a reservoir of liquid disinfectant located in the body of the telephone.

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Method of Disinfecting a Telephone Handset

Many people use telephone handsets in public locations, such as those located on pay telephones and on hotel room telephones on a consistent basis. It is highly probable that communicable diseases are spread by the use of telephone handsets. Bacteria are transmitted to the handset by one person, and transferred to the next user when they pick up the handset and place it close to their face and mouth.

It is feasible to wash hands or to utilize a hand-sanitizing product after using a telephone. Doing so would prevent the spread of disease via hand to mouth contact. However, one must also be protected from potential transfer of germs or bacteria to the skin and mouth as one is speaking into the telephone. An apparatus incorporated into the telephone to sanitize the earpiece and mouthpiece between uses would solve this problem.

The present invention is a set of pads installed on the body of the telephone that contain disinfectant, which is supplied by a reservoir of liquid disinfectant located in the body of the telephone.

Figure 1 Top view of telephone and telephone handset showing cleaning pads

Figure 1 shows telephone 100, which includes a telephone handset 110 having earpiece 112 and mouthpiece 114, fixedly attached to a body 120 with a cord 125. A first disinfectant pad 130 and a second disinfectant pad 140 are located on body 120 such that telephone handset 110 rests on first disinfectant pad 130 and second disinfectant pad 140 when replaced on body 120 after use.

Figure 2 Side view of telephone and telephone handset showing cleaning pads and disinfectant reservoir

Figure 2 shows how a reservoir 210 may be filled with a disinfectant 212, closed with a cap 215, and how reservoir 210 supplies disinfectant 212 to first disinfectant pad 130 and second disinfectant pad 140 via delivery line 220. When telephone handset 110 rests on body 120, earpiece 112 contacts first disinfectant pad 130 and mouthpiece 114 contacts second disinfectant pad 140.

In operation, after telephone handset 110 is used for a phone call, it is placed back on body 120. As telephone handset 100 rests on first disinfectant pad 130 and second disinfectant pad 140, disinfectant in the pads contacts both earpiece 112 and mouthpiece 114 of telephone handset 110 and destroys any germs on its surface.