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APPARATUS FOR OPTIMIZING THE TEMPERATURE IN A ROOM DEPENDING ON USE PATTERNS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000004375D
Publication Date: 2000-Oct-19
Document File: 1 page(s) / 68K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

The present invention is an apparatus for optimizing the temperature in a room depending on use patterns in the room.

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APPARATUS FOR OPTIMIZING THE TEMPERATURE IN A ROOM DEPENDING ON USE PATTERNS

People who work at desks in offices require different environmental conditions than do people who move about within an office. Someone whose duties involve a mixture of deskwork and physically active work are often either slightly cold or slightly warm depending on the specific activity of the moment. Furthermore, if work needs require leaving an office for some period of time, the need to sustain a given temperature diminishes. What is needed is a way to vary the temperature of a room according to randomly changing use patterns. Accordingly, the present invention is an apparatus for optimizing the temperature in a room depending on use patterns in the room.

Figure 1 Chair with integral sensor with RF link to a thermostat

The present invention is an apparatus for optimizing the temperature in a room that includes a chair 100 and a thermostat 150, as shown in Figure 1. Chair 100 includes legs 120, seat 110, optional seat back 130, and sensor 140. Sensor 140 further includes a pressure sensitive transducer electrically coupled to an integral low-power transmitter that is capable of emitting a radio frequency (RF) signal. Thermostat 150 includes an RF detector tuned to the RF signal emitted by the low-power transmitter.

In operation, chair 100 is positioned proximate to thermostat 150 so that the RF detector in thermostat 150 can detect signals emitted by sensor 140. Thermostat 150 is further configured with a first temperature setting and a second setting. The first sitting corresponds to an unoccupied chair 100, and a second setting corresponds to an occupied chair 100. The presence of someone seated on chair 100 causes sensor 140 to generate a signal that is detected by thermostat 150. Thermostat 150 then adjusts the room temperature to meet the second setting. When the person seated on chair 100 stands up, sensor 140 ceases to transmit the signal, and thermostat 150 resets the room temperature to the first temperature setting.