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Motivating submission of new conditional purchase offers from past rejected purchasers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000004398D
Publication Date: 2000-Nov-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

In conditional purchase offer (CPO) systems popularized by companies such as Priceline.com, system and methods for allowing purchasers to set their own price for items such as plane tickets have been patented. The frustration experienced by unsuccessful purchasers and the disenfranchisement of those purchasers, however, has not been addressed in the prior or subsequent art related to this technology. If customers are lost due to rejection of their offers, they can be nonetheless pursued in the future by tracking their stored user information from past CPO submissions. Using the practices summarized herein, this can be accomplished.

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Motivating submission of new conditional purchase offers from past rejected purchasers

In conditional purchase offer (CPO) systems popularized by companies such as Priceline.com, system and methods for allowing purchasers to set their own price for items such as plane tickets have been patented. The frustration experienced by unsuccessful purchasers and the disenfranchisement of those purchasers, however, has not been addressed in the prior or subsequent art related to this technology. If customers are lost due to rejection of their offers, they can be nonetheless pursued in the future by tracking their stored user information from past CPO submissions. Using the practices summarized below, this can be accomplished.

Figure 1 is a block diagram showing the architecture of an illustrative central server 100 used to motivate submission of new conditional purchase offers from past rejected purchasers. Central server 100 preferably includes certain standard hardware components, such as a central processing unit (CPU) 105, a random access memory (RAM) 110, a read only memory (ROM) 120, a clock 125, a data storage device 130, and comm (communication) port 140. The CPU 105 is preferably linked to each of the other listed elements, either by means of a shared data bus, or dedicated connections. CPU 105 preferably includes a control unit, an arithmetic logic unit (ALU), and a CPU local memory storage device, such as, for example, a stackable cache or a plurality of registers, in a known manner. These elements are noted in Figure 1 as a crypto processor 108. The control unit is operable to retrieve instructions from the data storage device 130 or ROM 120. The ALU is operable to perform a plurality of operations needed to carry out instructions. The CPU local memory storage device is operable to provide high-speed storage used for storing temporary results and control information.

In operation, data storage device 130 includes a seller database 200, a buyer database 300, an offer database 400, a seller rules database 500 and a monies (or compensation) database 500. Seller database 200 stores information on each seller, which is registered with the CPO management system to sell products, i.e., goods and/or services to CPO buyers, including contact information. Buyer database 300 stores information on each buyer transacting business through the CPO management system, including identification information and billing information, such as a credit card number or another general-purpose account identifier. Offer database 400 contains a record of each CPO processed by the CPO management system, including the conditions associated with the CPO and the associated status. Seller rules database 500 maintains the CPO rules for one or more agency-based sellers. Monies database 600 stores the various rejection compensation offers and corresponding predefined eligibility criteria. The combined information stores in data storage device 130 can be queried and filtered usi...