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Using Screen Savers as Virtual Computer Billboards

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000004419D
Publication Date: 2000-Nov-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 4K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Screen savers can be easily programmed to display its properties or give links to those marketing or selling the image or the product displayed on the screen saver with just a right click of a mouse. These screen could be produced and marketed by travel agencies, airlines or even artists such as painters or photographers who want to sell or advertise their works or products to more people. Right click of the mouse on screen saver and it displays information about the image or product displayed on the screen saver. Display information can include name of company or person/artist selling product and point of contact whether it be through a link to company website or phone number and address of those advertising.

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Using Screen Savers as Virtual Computer Billboards

The Computer Desktop Encyclopedia describes a screen saver as a program which displays either a completely black image or a constantly changing image on a computer monitor to prevent a stationary image from "burning" into the phosphor of the screen. Screen savers usually start automatically after the computer has had no user input for a preset time. Some screen savers come with many different modules, each giving a different effect.

Approximately pre-1990, many cathode ray tubes, in TVs, computer monitors or elsewhere, were prone to "burn-in"; that is, if the same pattern (e.g., the WordPerfect status line; the Pong score readout; or a TV channel-number display) were shown at the same position on the screen for very long periods of time, the phosphor on the screen would "fatigue" and that part of the screen would seem greyed out, even when the CRT was off.

Eventually CRTs were developed which were resistant to burn-in (and which sometimes went into sleep mode after a period of inactivity); but in the meantime, solutions were developed: home video game systems of the era (e.g., Atari 2600s) would, when not being played, change the screen every few seconds, to avoid burn-in; and computer screen saver programs were developed.

The first screen savers were simple screen blankers. Today, screen savers have become more and more complex, with animations and images of all sorts. The initial use of screen savers has long been forgotten and now have become tools to be marketed and commercialized. Unfortunately, users or passerby's who see these screen savers don't know where it originated from or the source of the image being displayed. For example, travel agencies, airlines, and tourism industries can use screen savers to market and commercialize getaway destinations and other types of vacations. Images of exotic destinations filled with crystal clear waters and long beaches can be very appealing and can become virtual billboards on every computer. But without information of the image, where it was captured, etc. you lose potential customers or anyone interested in more information about what was being displayed on the screen saver.

Screen savers can have an added use. Screen savers can be easily programmed to display its "properties" or give links to those marketing or selling the image or the product displayed on the screen saver with just a right click of a mouse. These screen could be produced and marketed by travel agencies, airlines or even artists such as painters or photographers who want to sell or advertise their works or products to more people.

Right click of the mouse on screen saver and it displays information about the image or product displayed on the screen saver. Display information can include name of company or person/artist selling product and point of contact whether it be through a link to comp...